Create a flexible fitness plan

There’s nothing worse than arriving at the gym, detailed workout plan in hand, only to find the equipment you need already occupied.

Sometimes it’s just a matter of waiting a few minutes for your turn. Or asking the woman resting between sets of lat pulldowns if you can ‘work in’.

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She looks super friendly. I wouldn’t hesitate to ask to ‘work in’!

Other days, you can just tell that the guy in the squat rack plans on doing his entire workout there.

And those times when the gym is so crowded there’s no space left to claim? Super frustrating.

For many of us, just getting to the gym is a big deal (feeling a bit of ‘gymtimidation’? Here are some tips for increasing your confidence in the weight room). Having to then figure out what to do in place of the program we’d planned on is enough to discourage us from getting off the elliptical or even starting our workout in the first place.

The best solution to all of the above challenges? Creating a flexible fitness plan.

In this case, ‘flexible’ doesn’t refer to how ‘bendy’ you are (although stretching does need to be a regular part of your exercise routine). Instead, it means being creative and knowledgable enough to modify your program on the fly.

Let me explain.

Olympic bar back squats are the first exercise on your program. But ‘squat rack guy’ is doing five hundred sets of dead lifts there (and then plans of staying put for a biceps workout…). Today, you might substitute another squat for your back squat, looking around to see what other equipment is available to get the job done. Sure, your dumbbell squats might not be as heavy as you’d like, but you can always perform some extra reps or slow the tempo down to achieve the same result. (Need some alternate squat suggestions? Here are a few of my favourite squat variations).

Next you’re headed to the lat pulldown machine. But your gym only has one and it seems like there’s always somebody sitting on it. You can perform the same exercise on a cable and pulley machine or by wrapping a band around the chin-up bar and banging out a few assisted pull-ups. (Here’s a short video demo of band-assisted pull-ups).

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I’m still working on these. They’re one of my ’50 before 50′ goals

The key is to know which muscle group(s) a particular exercise is working and being armed with a few alternatives before you get to the gym.

Not sure what to substitute? If you’re working with a trainer, ask her for exercise alternatives (I give my 40+ Online Fitness clients a choice of three moves per exercise; moves that often include different equipment, as well as different levels of intensity). If not, find an online resource (I like Bodybuilding.com) or a book (Women’s Health Big Book of Exercises illustrates dozens of variations of the ‘big’ lifts) and do a little research.

Other suggestions for creating a flexible fitness plan?
  • alter the order of your exercises; just because back squat is the first exercise in your program doesn’t mean that you always need to start with it.

While your trainer (or program writer) had a good reason for placing it there, switching up the order of exercises from time to time won’t hinder your progress. Better to do those squats later on in the program (even if it means your legs have been pre-fatigued by another exercise and you don’t add as many plates to the bar) than to skip them entirely.

You may notice that certain exercises become more (or less) challenging when you vary their order in your workout. Personally, I enjoy it when I feel an exercise a little bit more than usual 🙂

  • switch up cardio and strength workouts; if you perform cardio and strength workouts on separate days, substitute one for the other on a day when either the cardio machines are full or there’s no room on the weight room floor.

If you perform them both within the same workout, switch the order to maximize your access to the equipment. Although there are circumstances in which the order you perform these components of your workout makes a difference, if your options are ‘reverse the order’ and ‘skip weights (or cardio) entirely’, worry less about the effects of order and more about getting the whole workout done.

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My current favourite cardio machine

  • take it to the halls (or track or out-of-doors); many gyms and rec centres have alternate places you can perform your workout. If space is limited in the gym, grab a few pieces of equipment (again, you’ll need to know which exercises to substitute for the exercises in your program that require barbells, cable and pulley machines and the squat rack) and head out into the hall or up to the walking track.

Some facilities will even let you take equipment outside (walking lunges in the parking lot or TRX training at the soccer field, perhaps). Check with the weight room attendant before you make off with equipment though; we want to ensure that your membership doesn’t get revoked…).

  • jump into a group fitness class instead; most gyms offer group fitness and spinning classes in addition to cardio machines and a weight room. Typically, these will be happening at the same times the gym is busy (mornings and evenings are the most popular times for exercise and facilities managers schedule their classes accordingly). If you’re new to strength training, group fitness classes are a great place to start.

Given the popularity of resistance training, it’s a good bet that many of the classes your facility offers will include (or consist entirely of) a strength training component. Turn the frustration of a busy gym into an opportunity to learn some new moves and get instruction on proper form.

While it’s always a good idea to have a written workout plan before you hit the gym, there are days when you’ll need to be flexible to get it done. A flexible fitness plan, as it were!

P.S. I’ve recently made a change to my newsletter frequency. Instead of writing only when I publish a new blog post, I’m challenging myself to share more regularly. Add your name to my newsletter list and you’ll receive twice weekly emails from me. More conversational, off-the-cuff, personal story stuff than I share here, with the goal of engaging more with all of you.

Not on the list? Click this link and watch for your first email from me >> Fitknitchick Email Updates

Customizing online workouts to make them work for you

As a personal trainer and fitness aficionado, I spend a lot of time searching online for workout ideas and new exercise combinations.

I include them in my own workouts, as well as those of my clients.

I have Pinterest boards full of online workouts I’ve pinned for a later day (including workouts I’ve shared here, with my readers. Recognize any of them?).

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The thing is, most online workouts weren’t put together with YOU in mind. Your unique body. Your fitness level and experience. Your performance, aesthetic and lifestyle goals. Not to mention you may not have the equipment required to complete the workout in its entirely.

While they’re fun to do in a pinch (when you’re on the road or ready for a new exercise program) and may have been written by a personal trainer (someone who’s educated in the principles of workout design), chances are, you’ll need to modify most workouts you see online to address your own unique goals and needs.

Common reasons for modifying an online workout (with suggested work arounds) include:
  • arthritis in the hands and wrists: substitute supine bench exercises with dumbbells like triceps skull crushers and bench press for tricep dips and pushups, respectively. If you have access to a Smith machine, try placing your hands on the bar while you perform your pushups (this is also a great way to progress from knee to toe pushups!).
  • ‘achey’ knees that prevent pain-free squats and lunges: substitute supine hip thrusts, lateral band walks and hamstring curls on the ball to effectively target the legs and butt.
  • excess body weight, poor level of fitness or joints that restrict your ability to include high impact moves: substitute high knees walking-in-place for running or jumping jacks; step, rather than jump back into the high plank portion of a burpee; stationary cycling for the upright elliptical and treadmill (of course, losing weight will help reduce the stress of performing these exercises and may be all you need to improve the function and health of the joints 🙂 )
  • not enough time: shorten online workouts by reducing the number of sets by one or the duration of intervals by 25-30%, rather than skipping the workout entirely or by-passing much-needed post-workout stretching
  • limited equipment: substitute dumbbells for kettlebells, sandbags and barbells (you may need to modify the exercise slightly as well); use a stability ball in lieu of a workout bench; many cable and pulley exercises can be approximated with a resistance band; bottles of milk, water and diet pop can also work as hand weights in a pinch!
  • too many reps: lots of online workouts are high volume in nature. Performing hundreds of pushups, squats and crunches isn’t necessarily the best way to improve your fitness level. Reduce the number of reps and perform the exercises with heavier weights than suggested. You’ll not only shorten the workout, you’ll also build strength more quickly (and see muscle development faster).

One of the skills that I strive to teach my group fitness participants and personal training clients (both in person and those who belong to my online training group) is to listen to their bodies.

Pay attention to and avoid movements that cause pain. Choose more challenging versions of an exercise if it feels too easy. Substitute alternative movements for those that don’t serve you, rather than performing them incorrectly or skipping over them entirely.

Always make the workout your own.

Below is a sample of the types of workouts I share with my monthly #40plusfitness women’s online training group (not a member? Registration for the July through September Summer Session is now open You can find more information here >> 40+ Online Fitness Group and a direct link to the registration form here >> Summer 2016 Registration Open Now.

Each exercise has two modifications; one that’s slightly less challenging, one that’s slightly more challenging.

Make this online workout your own by choosing the modification of each exercise that allows you to (just) complete 12 good form repetitions. And feel free to mix and match from the three levels shown; chances are you’ll find some of the middle column options too easy while other will be too difficult.

If you’re brand new to exercise (and/or strength training), one set of each exercise pair is likely enough. More experienced? Need a bit more of a challenge? Try a second (and even a third) time through each super-set.

The key is to listen to your body and work at a level that’s challenging, leaves you feeling like your had a good workout and lets you walk up and down the stairs the next day without too much discomfort :-).

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My clients performed this workout 3-4 times weekly for an entire month. (I gave them weekly progressions, including the plyometric moves between the exercise pairs during weeks 3 and 4. Feel free to include these or not, depending on whether 60 s of jumping jacks, burpees or skipping rope meets your fitness needs and abilities.)

Not sure about the correct way to perform the above exercises?

Take a peak at the Demonstration Videos that I usually only share with my monthly peeps. A picture may be worth a thousand words, but a video? Closer to a million 😉

Do you regularly perform workouts you’ve found online?

If so, do you modify them to address your own unique fitness goals and needs?

Why wait until the new year? Register for the 40+ Fitness Winter Session today

Registration for the 2016 Winter Session is now closed. Wishing you a peaceful and joy-filled holiday season with family and friends.

January is just around the corner.

If you’re like many of my clients and group fitness participants, you view the beginning of the year as the natural time to re-define your fitness goals and re-commit to an exercise plan.

While I’m not a huge believer in there being a ‘best’ time to start making healthy changes in your life (the best time is always today….), reality is, January 1st offers a ‘clean slate’, so to speak, and a time of higher motivation and commitment that’s worth capitalizing on.

Rather than go it alone, I invite you to join my 40+ fitness online community. A fitness and healthy living program for women 40 and older; women dealing with challenging schedules, changing hormones and often, ‘rear-view mirror’ mindsets about what constitutes health and fitness at this stage of their life.

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It’s a 3-month subscription program that includes
  • monthly workouts (with modifications for multiple fitness levels)
  • exercise demonstration videos (available only to participants of this program)
  • weekly coaching emails
  • and membership in a private Facebook group full of honest, intelligent, funny, motivating and inspiring women just like you (perhaps the best perk of the program)

You can read more details about the program (and answers to FAQ’s) here >> #40plusfitness Group Training

Registration is open until Sunday, December 20th at 6 pm PT. After that, I’ll be on hiatus over the holidays. Trying to find some peace and creating new traditions with my husband and boys.

I’d love it if you’d join us.

 

Returning to fitness as a beginner

For the past week, I’ve been trying to decide what to focus on as I return to fitness after the loss of my daughter.

I know that I need to get back to regular strength training (I can already see muscle loss and a quick push-up test confirmed that I’ve lost strength as well).

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I know that I need to challenge my heart and lungs (while daily walks are a great way to add movement and reduce stress, they aren’t quite intense enough to stave off cardiovascular de-conditioning).

I know that I need to stretch more (my lower back has been bothering me from too much sitting and my achilles tendonitis has been flaring up despite having been away from step class for a month).

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I know that I need to return to a more balanced way of eating (the past month has been fuelled primarily by comfort foods; breads, pasta, baking and way too much wine).

I know that I’m not drinking enough water (it’s easy to tell; just check the colour of your urine).

I’ve been looking over past programs that I’ve written for myself and I have to say, my heart just isn’t into body-part splits or HIIT or pre-exhaust supersets. Not to mention that I’ve de-conditioned enough to make those inappropriate until I’m stronger and have more energy.

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I’ve come to the conclusion that the best place to start is back at the beginning.

Returning to fitness as a beginner. Following a program that’s short in duration and doesn’t require more than two or three days a week. Focusing on simple nutritional swaps and being more mindful of my body’s need for water and whole foods. Re-creating the exercise and eating habits that have kept me healthy and happy for many years. One step at a time. Day by day.

Rather than look elsewhere for the ‘perfect’ program, I’m following my own 21-Day ‘Re’-Bootcamp.

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Three week of ‘easy entry’ workouts, daily coaching emails, health-promoting recipes and information to keep you motivated and sticking with your healthy habit goals.

(You can read all about it here >> 21-Day ‘Re’-Bootcamp; just make sure you use the form below to register or you’ll miss my gift of a price reduction..).

Not too short, not too long and exactly what I need during the three weeks leading up to Christmas (our first without Clara). I’ll admit that it will be a bit odd getting daily emails from myself,  but it’s been a while since I wrote them, so I’m sure they’ll see fresh enough 😉 .

All proceeds from this week’s registrations will be donated to B.C. Children’s Hospital in Clara’s name. We are so grateful for the loving and compassionate care they’ve provided us with, from her first visit to cardiology as a 4-month old baby right through to her final days in I.C.U.

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Not only will participating in this program help you to improve your own life, it’ll help another child and her family in their time of need.

UPDATE: I’d like to thank all of you who signed up for this program during the week of December 1 through 6. Altogether, we raised $880 dollars for the BC Children’s Hospital Foundation. I’ll be donating these monies in Clara’s name and attributing the donation to ‘Fitknitchick’s Friends and Followers’. 

 

 

 

5 Must-Have Exercise Books For Your Fitness Library

Whether you’re brand new to weight-lifting or a seasoned pro, getting better at your sport often means doing a little research. Spending some time watching exercise videos, or better yet, reading exercise books to learn a new exercise, improve your exercise form or find a new program to follow.

Traditionally, most of the strength training titles published focused almost exclusively on the goals and needs of men. In particular, young, virile, testosterone-fuelled men.

Don’t get distracted…Keep reading!

The needs of women were largely overlooked. Especially the needs of women who aren’t so much interested in getting ‘bikini ready’ (the focus of most fitness magazines) as ‘training for the sport of life’. Getting stronger, yes, but also becoming more capable of doing all the other activities we love, for today, tomorrow and a long time to come.

Fast forward to the mid-2000’s, where strength training titles for females exploded.

About time.

Fitnitchick’s 5 ‘must-have’ exercise books for your fitness library

 

Women’s Health Big Book of Exercise (2010; Adam Campbell)

A huge tome, not meant to be lugged back and forth to the gym (that would be a workout, in and of itself…), but perfect when you need to look up an exercise or find an alternative version of an old one that you’ve tired of.

The ‘Big Book’ is organized according to body part (Chest, Back, Shoulders, Arms, Quadriceps and Calves, Glutes and Hamstrings, Core and Total Body). For each major muscle group, the ‘main moves’ (that is, the fundamental moves that need to be mastered) are described first, followed by variations of each exercise that can be performed with different types of equipment (body weight, barbells, dumbbells, cable and pulley machines, stability balls and even the TRX suspension trainer).

Each and every exercise is illustrated, with easy-to-follow exercise descriptions and form cues. There’s even a section of ready-made workouts at the back (‘The Best Workouts for Everything’), including workouts for athletes, pre-natal women, body-weight only fans and my favourite, crowded gyms.

 

The Female Body Breakthrough (2009; Rachel Cosgrove)

One of the first strength training titles specifically aimed at getting regular women into the weight room. In addition to a 16-week, progressive resistance program (a program that I return to whenever I get tired of my own programming and want to follow somebody else’s lead…), Rachel Cosgrove’s book also includes advice about mindset, exercise nutrition, hormones, goal-setting and emotional eating.

The workouts are well-illustrated and there are plenty of testimonials to her approach scattered throughout the book; perfect for those day when you need a little motivation, inspiration and re-assurance that the program works. And for those of us who love it when fitness professionals cite actual research studies to back their claims, a list of references to original research in the fields of physiology, sports medicine and endocrinology.

 

The New Rules of Lifting for Women (2007; Lou Schuler with Cassandra Forsythe and Alwyn Cosgrove)

Another title dedicated to encouraging women to take strength training seriously (the subtitle of the book; “Lift Like a Man, Look Like a Goddess”…).

This books combines 16-weeks of progressive resistance training with a wealth of information on nutrition and eating for fat loss (including a variety of sample meal plans and recipes to support them).

The workouts are functional in nature (squats, lunges, dead lifts, rows, push ups) are rely heavily on standard weight room equipment (dumbbells, benches, barbells, cable and pulley etc.).

I love that the workouts are fairly simple in their design (typically 5-8 exercises, performed in super-set style) and don’t require more than 40-50 minutes in the gym. All exercises are illustrated with detailed instructions on how to perform them safely and with good form. This is another title that I’ve used extensively in my own training.

 

Kettlebells for Women (2012; Lauren Brooks)

Ever since I took my first kettlebell workshop, I’ve been enamoured with this relatively new-to-the-big-box-gym-goer tool. I love how it makes me feel strong and capable and bad-ass (despite the wrinkles and grey hairs…).

Because they’re not just simply a ‘weight with handles’, I recommend that all newcomers to kettlebell training either get some in-person instruction or find a good book or video to read and study before they set up for their first swing.

I think Kettlebells for Women is the perfect place to start. Beginning with a brief history of kettlebell training, the author outlines the benefits of using kettlebells (both in addition to and in place of traditional dumbbells and barbells) and provides suggestions as to the weight of bells the user should purchase (or have available to them) to maximize the benefits of her workouts.

The remainder of the book outlines a 12-week progressive resistance program. It includes 15 different workouts (with levels from beginner to advanced) and illustrated explanations of each exercise, including the exercises most frequently associated with kettlebell training; swings, cleans, windmills, snatches and the Turkish Get-Up.

The only downside to kettlebell training? The expense of the equipment. And the more frequently you do the workouts, the more quickly you’ll outgrow your equipment 😉

 

Ultimate Booty Workouts (2013, Tamara Grand aka Fitknitchick 😉 )

If you’re a relatively new visiter to this website, you won’t know that I published my first ever fitness title a little over a year and a half ago. Although titled ‘Ultimate Booty Workouts’, the book is much more than just an exercise program for building a better butt.

In it, I outline my fitness philosophy for women, including the importance of goal setting, tips for finding motivation, non-aesthetic benefits of strength training, nutrition to support your efforts in the gym as well as tips for measuring progress off and on the scale.

The program itself focuses on the core and lower body (hamstrings, glutes, calves and quads), with suggestions for incorporating upper body training and cardio into the 12-week program. All exercises are illustrated (you may recognize one of the models… hint, hint), as are the suggested warm up moves, stretches and foam rolling exercises. There are even blank workout templates for you to photocopy and take with you to the gym.

Curious as to what it was like to actually write a fitness book AND model for the photo shoot? I shared my experiences here and here, respectively.

 

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Books make great Christmas presents. Especially the last one 😉

Do you have any titles to add to my fitness library?

Any books that have been particularly helpful to you as you progress with strength training?

The “All you need is a bench (and your smartphone)” Workout

Disclaimer: The post (and the accompanying video workout) was sponsored by Corning® Gorilla® Glass. As always, opinions, errors and bad puns are my own.

There are three things that I never set foot on the gym floor or in the aerobics studio without;

  • A written plan; Whether it’s an outline to a group fitness class, a new program for a personal training client or my own workout for the day, having a plan is key to keeping the intensity up, the chit-chat down and the workout on track.
  • Water; I use workout time to fit in 1/2 to 3/4 of a litre. I sweat a lot when I’m exercising and use rest breaks between sets to rehydrate and stay energized.
  • My smartphone; Used for playing music and timing intervals in group fitness classes, tracking clients’ measurements and appointments and jotting down the reps, sets and loads completed in my own workouts, my phone is never more than an arm’s length away.

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Given the intensity of my workouts, the hard surfaces I often train on and the record number of people in the gym this time of year, I know that it’s only a matter of time before my phone goes flying off the back of the treadmill, gets dropped mid-burpee or stepped on by the guy on the bench next to me.

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Since my phone is essentially my brain’s back-up drive, containing not only all of my professional contacts’ information, but the calendars of my husband’s travel schedule and three children’s activities, I do worry about the potential damage such drops might cause. (Although I’m always up for an ‘excuse’ to upgrade my device… 😉 ).

Apparently, I’ve been worrying needlessly.

Turns out that the touch screen on my phone has Corning® Gorilla® Glass; a strengthened material that’s made by dipping glass into a molten salt bath of potassium nitrate. Potassium ions in the salt bath diffuse into the glass, creating a hardened compression layer on the surface. A layer that helps to protect the phone from damage when dropped.

In lab tests, Gorilla Glass 4 survives up to 80% of the time when dropped from a height of three feet (about the distance from the ‘phone ledge’ on most treadmills and ellipticals to the floor) and boasts improved damage resistance against sharp contact (like drops on the concrete in my carport, where today’s workout video was filmed).

The “All you need is a bench (and your smartphone and Gorilla Glass 4)” Workout

Today’s workout requires only that you have access to a bench and a smartphone; the bench for the workout itself and the phone to time your work and rest intervals.

Set your interval timer for 9 rounds of 45 s work and 15 s rest (18 intervals if you’re planning on going through a second time).

Perform AMRAP (as many reps as ‘pretty’) of each of the following exercises in the allocated interval (45 s), rest (15 s) then move on to the next exercise. See the video below for demonstrations of each exercise and my favourite coaching cues.

  • Lateral bench step ups (left foot on bench)
  • Bench push ups
  • Lateral bench step ups (right foot on bench)
  • Bench tricep dips
  • Split lunges (left foot on bench)
  • “Walking” plank
  • Split lunges (right foot on bench)
  • V-sit with leg lifts
  • Box jumps

Always begin each workout with a brief warm up (5 minutes or so of light calisthenics and range of motion joint movements). End with a stretch, focusing on the major muscle groups, including glutes, hamstrings, quads, chest, back and shoulders.

 

If you’ve enjoyed this workout, please take a minute to ‘Like’, ‘Comment’ and ‘Share’. Positive feedback makes the world go ’round!

 

Disclaimer: Although I am a Certified Personal Trainer, I am not YOUR Personal Trainer ;-). Interested in working with me? Check out the online fitness services I offer. I’d love to work with YOU!

Corning® Gorilla® Glass has been used on nearly 4 billion devices from 40 major brands. Is it on yours? Click here to find out.

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Corning® Gorilla® Glass. The opinions and text are all mine.

Work smarter not harder | Tips for prioritizing your workouts

In an ideal world, we’d all have time for daily exercise.

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Fitting in all of the recommended elements of fitness (cardio, strength, power, endurance, flexibility, speed and agility and energy system work) wouldn’t be a problem. Seven days times seven hours is lots of time to get it all done.

In reality, most people struggle to find the time to exercise. Work, family, volunteering and life commitments make it a challenge for many.

If I were to tell new clients that they needed to exercise six or seven days each week in order to see results, they’d either abandon our coaching relationship immediately or a few weeks down the road (after attempting to follow my advice and failing miserably).

Instead, I ask them the following questions and set them up for success by designing a plan that fits with their responses:

  • how much time do you have available for exercise (both the total number of days AND the number of minutes per day)
  • how much time do you want to spend exercising (this is typically much less than the total time available 😉 )
  • what is your primary exercise goal (losing weight, gaining muscle and completing your first half-marathon all have very different training requirements)

The less time they have for exercise, the SMARTER we need to be with their workout plans (and of course, the more diligent we have to be about nutrition…).

Given that most of my 40+ female clients are primarily interested in body composition change (i.e., simultaneously reducing body fat and gaining muscle), I make strength training their top priority.

Below you’ll find the starting point for my recommendations, based solely on the number of days each week the client will be working out.

If your goals are more performance-based (for example, training for a full or half-marathon), simply swap the ‘strength training’ workouts for the training mode that’s most relevant to what you hope to achieve.

Tips for prioritizing your workouts

If you’ll be working out 6 or 7 days per week… (make sure you’re not over-doing it and at least one of those workouts is lower in intensity)

  • 3-4 days of strength training (body part splits work well with this time commitment)
  • 1-2 days of long, slow distance cardio (30-60 minutes at 65-75% of max HR)
  • 1 day of HIIT-style cardio
  • 1 day of rest or stretching or restorative-type yoga

If you’ll be working out 5 days per week… (this is my own, personal sweet spot)

If you’ll be working out 4 days per week… (the frequency that most of my online clients adhere to)

  • 3 days of strength training (as above, choose between body part splits and whole-body training) with the addition of a Tabata or HIIT or Metabolic Conditioning-style finisher at the end of at least one of those workouts
  • 1 day of long, slow distance cardio

If you’ll be working out 3 days per week… (I consider this the bare minimum for a regular exercise program)

  • 3 days of whole body strength training, with the addition of a Tabata or HIIT or Metabolic Conditioning-style finisher at the end of one workout AND a short, steady state cardio finisher at the end of another

OR

  • 2 days of whole body strength training, with the addition of a Tabata or HIIT or Metabolic Conditioning-style finisher at the end of one workout
  • 1 day of long, slow distance cardio

If you’ll be working out 2 days per week… (this workout frequency will only yield results for beginners to exercise and help regular exercisers stay consistent while on holiday)

  • You’ll need to fit both strength and cardio into each session; whole body strength plus one HIIT-style finisher and one steady state cardio finisher
  • Plan on increasing this to 3 days per week as soon as possible!

Tips for becoming an independent exerciser

Before we get to today’s post, I’d like to take a minute and share some exciting news with you all.

As of September 1st, I’m stepping away from my personal training job at the gym. Doing so will allow me to spend more time focusing on my Online Fitness Coaching clients and my monthly 40+ Women’s Training group. Time is truly my most precious commodity and I just haven’t felt like I’ve had as much of it as I’d like to have to give to these strong, focused and committed women.

While I’ll miss my in-person clients, I’m looking forward to having increased control over my schedule and connecting with more women who are truly ready to make change and commit to the exercise, nutrition and mindset habits required to reach their health and fitness goals. 

When I start working with a new personal training client, I’m already thinking about how the relationship will end.

Not because I don’t enjoy the process of helping women learn how to move and feed their bodies, but because my goal is to teach them to do it for themselves. Personal training is expensive and should be viewed as a temporary investment, not a life-long relationship 🙂

Just as I expect my children to some day leave ‘the nest’, I expect each client to eventually take charge of their own health and fitness and ‘fledge’; to become an independent exerciser, in their own right.

becoming an independent exerciser

Okay. I’m not quite ready for this one to leave the nest yet…

Tips for becoming an independent exerciser
  • Create a schedule. You might start by scheduling your workouts for the same time as your regular once or twice-weekly personal training sessions. Those days and times are already part of your routine and heading to the gym then will be second nature. If you’ve been doing an extra workout or two as part of your personal training homework, you’re already comfortable with exercising on your own; keep it up. My favourite way to schedule my workouts? An old-school desk calendar.
  • Follow a written program. If your trainer has provided you with written programs during the period of your training relationship, dust them off and re-cycle them. Just because you’ve followed a program in the past, doesn’t mean it won’t continue to benefit you now. Besides, you’ll already be familiar with the exercises and your trainer’s notes will include form cues and the number of reps and sets to be performed. Don’t have an individualized program? Grab the latest copy of your favourite fitness and exercise magazine (print or on-line). The most popular titles all include a workout program of the month. Take it with you to the gym and follow it to the letter.
  • Document your workouts. If you lift it, log it. Keep track of your progress, just the way your personal trainer did. For each exercise, write down the number of reps and sets you performed, as well as the weight lifted. Attempt to progress your workouts every week or two. Add an extra set. Perform a few more reps. Increase your weights. Then, when you stop making progress (or find that you’re tired of the program), grab a new program and begin all over again.
  • Make friends in the gym. Introduce yourself to the woman who always seems to be doing core work at the same time you are. Not only will becoming friendly with your fellow gym-goers help with accountability (you know they’ll ask you where you’ve been if you a miss a workout or two…), they can also be a great source of knowledge and information. Ask them about a new exercise you see them performing. Maybe it’s one you’d benefit from as well. Get them to show you how to use a machine you’re unfamiliar with. Most people are happy to share their knowledge, especially if you ask nicely 😉
  • Set some time-bound goals. Create some goals with a due date. Things you can work towards over the course of a few weeks to a few months. Write them down and include the date on which you’ll re-visit them. Then, re-visit them to celebrate your successes or to give yourself a compassionate, but no-nonsense talking to about how you’ll need to change your approach to reaching the goal for it to manifest.
  • Find a half-way solution. No longer need someone to correct your squat, count your reps and tell you when your Tabata interval is over, but not quite ready to go it alone? Ask your trainer if they’re willing to see you every 4-6 for a program change. That one-hour session may be exactly what you need to keep you moving forward towards full-on independent exercise. Another option? Find an online training community that includes monthly workouts, nutrition support and advice about how to customize the workouts to make them your own. My monthly Online Group Training program for women over 40 is about to start a new 3-month session. Make sure you’re on my email list to be the first to get access to the registration materials.
  • Re-commit to your ‘why’ daily. Remind yourself of why you value exercise. List the benefits that it brings to your life. Think of how you feel when you miss a workout or two. Use your best ‘trainer voice’ to encourage, motivate and support yourself. Focus on developing a positive mindset around exercise; do it because you love your body, not because you dislike it. Above all, mindset is key to becoming an independent exerciser. Think you can do it? You’re right! Think you can’t? You’re probably right too…

Grab a copy of my free 3-book, ‘5 Steps to Exercise Happiness’ if you’re still struggling to find your ‘why’.

Have you made the leap from personal trainer to becoming an independent exerciser?

What’s your best advice for my readers?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A 6-exercise, whole-body stability ball workout

I got such great feedback from the three at-home workout videos I created and shared last month that I decided to make another one.

One that requires only a single piece of equipment; a stability ball.

stability ball workout

Don’t forget to ask your children if you can borrow their ‘chair’ for your workout!

Perfect for when you’re travelling to the cottage and don’t want to lug weights or kettlebells with you.

Perfect for those days when you’ve only got 20 minutes to squeeze in a workout.

Perfect for adding a bit of extra core focus to your strength training plan.

Perfect, perfect, perfect!

A 6-exercise, whole-body stability ball workout: Perform 12 repetitions (on each side, where applicable) of each of the following 6 exercises. Rest and repeat once or twice more. Don’t forget to stretch when you’re finished!

If you’ve enjoyed this workout, please take a minute to ‘Like’, ‘Comment’ and ‘Share’. Positive feedback makes the world go ’round!

Disclaimer: Although I am a Certified Personal Trainer, I am not YOUR Personal Trainer ;-).  Interested in working with me? Check out the online fitness services I offer. I’d love to work with YOU!