Tips for automating exercise and eating

Yesterday, I was texting with a friend and mentioned that I was on my way out to get a hair cut (and colour, truth be told). She commented on how impressed she was that I “was still prioritizing the small self care stuff that makes us feel better” even though my life’s been recently turned upside down.

I hadn’t really thought of what I was doing as self-care (of course it is) or something that was going to make me feel better (it certainly did). I scheduled this appointment at the end of my last appointment and was simply doing what my calendar told me I had to do today.

automating exercise and eating

Losing those greys always makes me feel better…

I like to think of this way of going about the day as ‘auto-piloting’ and apply the same strategy to many areas of my life, including exercising and nutrition.

While living on ‘auto-pilot’ might seem to be in direct opposition to the ‘live in the moment’ and ‘be present’ advice we see daily on social media, when used correctly, it can free us from wasting time and mental energy on trivial decisions.

Like what to wear. Which route to take to work. When and where to workout. Which exercises to include. What and when to eat. How best to load the dishwasher…

A little Google-searching tells me that ‘decision fatigue’ is a real and recognized psychological condition in which a person’s productivity (and ability to make future decisions) suffers as a result of becoming mentally exhausted from making so many irrelevant decisions.

The simple act of making decisions degrades one’s ability to make more decisions.

The solution? Make the decision once (and ahead of time) and use the ‘auto-pilot’ strategy to follow through.

I’ve found the following ‘auto-pilot’ strategies to help me (and many of my clients) commit to regular exercise and healthier eating.

Pick a couple that resonate with you and commit to trying them for a month.

Tips for automating exercise and eating
  • register for a group fitness program; perfect for those who need a bit more accountability and are unlikely to skip an activity that they’ve paid for in advance (with the added benefit of not having to figure out what you’re going to do when you get to the gym; your instructor or coach does all the planning, you just show up and follow their instructions). I’m currently using this auto-pilot strategy and it’s working for me.
  • pack your gym bag and organize your workout clothes in advance; remove the early morning (or after work) decision-making by having your workout clothes chosen and set out the night before, a clean towel and water bottle in your gym bag and you running shoes, wallet and keys waiting by the door
  • schedule your meals for the week; grab a notebook (paper or electronic), create a list of breakfast, lunch and dinner menus and FOLLOW IT (here’s a free meal planning tool you can download, print out and fill in with your menu ideas)
  • simplify your diet; let go of the idea that a food needs to entertain and that a limited diet is boring; create two or three simple ‘go-to’ breakfast, lunch and dinner menus that are nutritious and complete. Tack them to the fridge door (or someplace else in the kitchen where you’ll see them). No more standing in front of the pantry wondering what you should eat and whether it will ‘fit your macros’.
  • create a grocery shopping ‘check-list’; create an electronic check-list of the foods you eat regularly, ordered according to the route you take through the grocery store. Print out a copy, stick it on your fridge and tick off items as you run out of them. This one simple task allows me to do my bi-weekly $300 Superstore shop in less than an hour.
  • cook once, dine twice; double the size of your dinners with the goal of incorporating left-overs into the next day’s lunch. Not only does this save you cooking and lunch-prep time, it also removes one more decision during your weekly meal planning task.
  • pack tomorrow’s lunch and snacks after dinner; super easy if you’re packing left-overs (they have to be put back in the fridge anyways) and you’ll be more likely to make healthy choices with a full tummy (and when you’re not in a rush)

These are just a few of the ‘auto-pilot’ strategies that I’ve tried and found useful.

What are your favourite tips for automating exercise and eating? 

 

 

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Nutrition and grief | tips for helping those suffering from loss {Guest Post}

From Tamara ~ My family and I are truly grateful for all of the meals and snacks and foodie gifts of love and comfort that our friends and family provided in the weeks following my daughter’s death. I’ve asked my friend, fellow blogger and Registered Dietician Melanie, of Nutritious Eats to share some ideas about nutrition and food prep during periods of grieving; so you’ll be ready to step in and help out a friend in need when the time arises. Thanks so much Melanie for your willingness to share your thoughts (and recipes!) with us.

From Melanie ~ I have had the pleasure of getting to know Tamara through blogging and social media and am struck by her grace, positivity and beauty inside and out. I truly wish it were under different circumstances that I would be providing this guest post, but Tamara and I believe that this information might help someone else during such a tragic time.

Providing food for someone who is grieving with the loss of a loved one is one of the simplest ways to show how much we care. At such a devastating time it’s hard to feel like you’re doing anything to help. Although we can only imagine all the emotions the family is going through, one thing we can be certain of is that cooking is far from their minds. But people don’t bring meals forever and the grieving process doesn’t have a definitive time period. Unfortunately the need to consume food isn’t going to just go away.

Today I am providing a few nutrition and meal prep tips to help families get through this extremely difficult and stressful time, as well as tips for friends and family members who want to help.

Nutrition and grief: Tips for Grieving Families 
  • Keep meal prep simple. Think of it in terms of food groups- make a batch of whole grains like quinoa, a lean protein like some grilled chicken or fish, a batch of hard-boiled eggs, a couple of vegetables (one could be salad which will keep in the fridge for days undressed), fruit and dairy.
  • Rely more on convenience items like canned beans, jarred tomato sauce, pre-shredded cheese, pre-cut vegetables
  • Buy a few healthy condiments like pesto, salsa, guacamole or a fresh dressing to jazz up those basic foods you’re preparing
  • It’s important to eat 3 meals a day to keep your blood sugars stable and avoid binging on junk food
  • Caffeine has negative side affects on the brain and nervous system if used in excess so try to keep consumption at ~2 cups a day
  • Don’t omit fat, stress will cause you to crave it, but rely on healthy fat like avocado, nuts, olive oil and fatty fish like salmon
  • Lean proteins will assist in growth and tissue repair- focus on lean beef, chicken, turkey, tofu, shrimp, eggs, nuts and seafood
  • Getting enough Omega 3 fatty acids can help with our response- focus on fish, nuts, flax seeds and leafy vegetables
  • Get your Vitamin C which protect the immune system so stock up on citrus fruits and vegetables like broccoli and potatoes
  • B vitamins are essential for coping with stress as they are used in building up your metabolism

It’s common to want to provide something delicious and comforting that the family will love, but the high carb, high fat “comforting” fare, along with ample desserts and wine can eventually catch up with anyone. Food affects the way we feel, our energy, our skin, or digestive system, so it’s important we are providing our loved ones with proper nutrition to help nourish their body, mind and spirit.

Traumatic events not only affect one’s emotional state, but also their metabolic and hormonal state. The amount of stress that their bodies go through can play havoc on their health. For example. when the stress hormone cortisol is elevated it can contribute to fat accumulation, usually around the abdomen or in the blood vessels and if stress is prolonged, which of course it would be if you lost a loved one, possible health effects such as high blood pressure, chronic muscle tension, headaches can also occur. Unhealthy food will just make it worse.

Nutrition and Grief: Tips for Providing Meals to Grieving Loved Ones
  • Make sure your dish or meal is well-balanced and nutrient-dense. Offer a few different food groups with your meal.
  • Use lean meats and seafood instead of higher fat cuts of meat
  • Avoid recipes that call for too much butter, cheese and/or cream or whole milk
  • Offer healthier baked goods like whole grain muffins using nuts and fruit which are perfect for the freezer too
  • Also consider bringing healthy snacks like date and nut energy bites
  • Bring something light such as a grilled chicken salad along with a hearty soup which can be used as a freezer meal for a later date if needed
  • Warm foods like soups and stews are very comforting and can be packed with heart-healthy vegetables
  • Provide food in disposable containers or tupperware they can keep so there doesn’t need to be any coordination of returning dishes
  • Use a calendar to share amongst friends to avoid duplication and to cater to the family’s likes and dislikes (more information below)
Nutrition and grief; Registered Dietician-suggested recipes for healthy, tasty and nourishing meals

Vegetarian Chili

This hearty bowl of vegetables will provide plant-based energy and fiber. Pack mini tupperware containers with all the fixings.

Vegetarian Chili | Nutritious Eats

Saucy Slow Cooker Turkey Meatballs

Who doesn’t love a slow cooker recipe? You could pack some cooked veggies or a salad on the side and a healthy grain like quinoa or a high fiber pasta to go with it.

Meaty Mushroom Marinara

This is made with lean ground turkey and veggies and is a great option to spoon over pasta or steamed cauliflower.

Meaty Mushroom Marinara

Hearty Vegetable Soup

This is my go-to soup recipe not only when I am under the weather, but when I am craving something healthy and satisfying.

Chicken Fajita Bowls

Fajita bowls are great because they can be customized per person and are very well balanced. It also is perfect for leftovers and I think they are well liked by most people. You could do lean beef or strictly vegetarian too.

Chicken Fajita Bowls | Nutritious Eats

Chipotle Turkey and Sweet Potato Chili 

Another chili recipe because chili makes a great comforting meal, it’s even better leftover and freezes well! This one uses a learn protein, turkey, along with the super nutritious sweet potato.

Kale and Quinoa Salad

This makes the perfect light lunch and will last in the fridge all week. It makes a good amount and is packed with nutritious goodness from the high-protein quinoa, the antioxidant and vitamin/mineral rich kale and almonds.

KaleandQuinoaSalad-1-2

Slow Cooker Asian Pulled Pork

This is another versatile dish that can be served with the lettuce wraps, a tortilla or spooned over brown rice.

Apple Pie Walnut Donuts With Vanilla Glaze

It’s natural to want to provide something sweet during stressful times, but you can find lighter options. These donuts are made with yogurt, whole wheat flour and almond milk and will still satisfy that craving without as much fat and calories.

Peanut Butter Oatmeal Bars

Providing something to be eaten for breakfast or snack is helpful too. These are the perfect thing and super easy to make (one-bowl required!)

Peanut Butter Oatmeal Bars | Nutritious Eats

I strongly encourage you to set up a online calendar which can make providing food or other helpful services so much easier. I have used CareCalendar before which is very convenient. This is how it works: one person will set up the calendar for the person or family in need. You can chose a date range for how long help is needed, for example one month. Then just fill in information such as the recipients usual meal time, dietary preferences like dislikes and favorite foods, and other helpful info like if they have freezer space available. This information will help the giver quite a bit!

Another great thing about sharing a calendar with the friends and family of the recipient is then other people can see what type of meal you are providing which reduces duplication. That way not everyone brings a lasagna. I also love that this online calendar is not limited to just meals- you can have friends or family sign up to help with yard work, errands such as grocery shopping, babysitting, etc. We all can imagine just how difficult day to day tasks are when you have just lost a family member or loved one and I think any help would be appreciated.

I hope this was helpful and remember that no one knows what the grieving family needs so it’s okay to ask. While one family might need meals for a month, another might need help for much longer. It’s never too late to get this set up to help those we love.

Keep those healthy meals coming!

MelanieF.-1-200x300Melanie is a Registered Dietitian and mom of four, with extensive experience in wellness and weight management. By combining her passion of food, nutrition and exercise, Melanie encourages her clients to have a healthy and happy relationship with food. She is the author of the blog Nutritious Eats where you can find healthy family recipes, nutrition and fitness tips and more. When she is not cooking or blogging, you can find her drinking coffee on the porch, chasing her children around, running, doing yoga, and practicing photography. You can follow her on twitter , instagram or Facebook.

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10 Ways to Overcome Emotional Eating {Guest post}

I have a treat for you today, dear readers. A guest post written by my kind, generous, compassionate, insightful and very smart friend Evelyn Parham. Evelyn and I first met via our blogs. We read, shared and supported one another’s writing. She then joined my online women’s group training program, developed a passion for the emotional side of nutrition and recently obtained her certification as an Eating Psychology Coach. I know that you’ll love her as much as I do!

Have you ever felt sad, stressed, or angry?

What happened when you experienced the emotions? Many of you probably reached for comforting food. There is nothing wrong with eating food to feel good. But eating food for the sake of helping you deal with emotions is not the best way to deal with your emotions.

Emotional eating does not discriminate; it touches everyone. Overcoming emotional eating takes time. Even after learning how to overcome emotional eating, there will be times when emotional eating will pull you back in.

Why? Because you have emotions and you are an eater.

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Here are ten ways to overcome emotional eating.

Overcome Emotional Eating
  • Pay attention to your emotions. Oftentimes emotions get suppressed and suppression leads to you ignoring emotions that get stirred up within you. If you are sad, acknowledge the emotion and take time to deal with the emotion. Dealing with the emotion when you know it is present helps you control emotional eating.
  • Do not eat to fill a void. Emotional eating is when one eats to fill a void, but when you pay attention to your emotions, you are less likely to eat your feelings. A void means there is space for other things to fit in your life. Fill the void doing activities that take your mind off eating food.
  • Be mindful when eating. Take time to enjoy eating. Let your mind engage with the flavor, texture and aroma of the food you are eating. Eat when you feel hungry and stop eating when you feel satisfied. Do not surf the web, watch television or do any other activity besides eating. When you are pre-occupied with other actives besides eating, you will eat mindlessly which can lead to overeating.
  • Stop fighting food or trying to control yourself with food. You need food to fuel your body and when you fight against food, you usher in stress chemistry. Stress impacts your emotional heath and when you are stressed, you eat. Learn to embrace food for what it is, and for what it does for your body. Enjoy food without putting restrictions on yourself.
  • Write in a journal. Journaling is a good way to express yourself. Each time you put any food in your mouth, write it down in your journal. Write down any emotions you are feeling when you eat. Also, document how much food you consume. Journaling helps you pinpoint when you are most likely to eat your feelings.
  • Do not eat anything when you know you are emotional. If you know you are sad, upset, or stressed, do not put any food in your mouth. Do not try to bury your emotions, because eventually they will come out and express themselves in your food choices. Instead of reaching for comfort food, take a deeper look at the emotion you are feeling. Allow yourself time to feel the emotion and work through it without reaching for food to numb your feelings.
  • Slow down while eating and slow your breathing. Eating fast causes stress chemistry to rear its ugly head. Stress chemistry causes lots of things to go awry in your body. Do your best to slow down when you eat your food. One way you can slow down when eating is to slow your breathing. Slowing your breathing calms you down and it also decreases the stress chemistry that happens when you eat fast.
  • Exercise or do movement that you enjoy. Exercising is a good way to work through your emotions. The next time you feel emotional, go for a walk or do your favorite exercise or movement. Exercising or movement is relaxing and when your body is relaxed, your mind is also.
  • De-stress your mind, body and spirit. Take time to de-stress daily. Meditate or spend some quiet time alone. Spend a day getting pampered. Get out and enjoy nature. These are all ways of de-stressing, but the most important thing you can ever do is take time for yourself and be with yourself.
  • Talk to someone about your emotions. Holding in your emotions does more harm than good. It is always a good idea to work through the emotions you feel. Feelings and emotions oftentimes get expressed through food. Talk about your emotions with someone you trust. Opening up to someone helps you uncover and work through the emotions you feel. Never be ashamed to talk it out.
Final Words

It does not matter what emotion you feel, please whatever you do, let it out. Holding in emotions affects your mind, body and spirit. Working through your emotions decreases your need to reach for food to fill the void.

Do not suppress your emotions. Allow yourself time to feel the emotion. Remember, you are an emotional being with feelings. If you feel sad, work through all that comes with feeling sad. Let the tears flow and do not hold back.

Screen Shot 2015-07-18 at 8.25.38 AMEvelyn Parham, M.S. is a Blogger and Eating Psychology Coach. She helps people live nourished, balanced and whole. Learn more about Evelyn at http://evelynparham.com/about.
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