5 Must-Have Exercise Books For Your Fitness Library

Whether you’re brand new to weight-lifting or a seasoned pro, getting better at your sport often means doing a little research. Spending some time watching exercise videos, or better yet, reading exercise books to learn a new exercise, improve your exercise form or find a new program to follow.

Traditionally, most of the strength training titles published focused almost exclusively on the goals and needs of men. In particular, young, virile, testosterone-fuelled men.

Don’t get distracted…Keep reading!

The needs of women were largely overlooked. Especially the needs of women who aren’t so much interested in getting ‘bikini ready’ (the focus of most fitness magazines) as ‘training for the sport of life’. Getting stronger, yes, but also becoming more capable of doing all the other activities we love, for today, tomorrow and a long time to come.

Fast forward to the mid-2000’s, where strength training titles for females exploded.

About time.

Fitnitchick’s 5 ‘must-have’ exercise books for your fitness library


Women’s Health Big Book of Exercise (2010; Adam Campbell)

A huge tome, not meant to be lugged back and forth to the gym (that would be a workout, in and of itself…), but perfect when you need to look up an exercise or find an alternative version of an old one that you’ve tired of.

The ‘Big Book’ is organized according to body part (Chest, Back, Shoulders, Arms, Quadriceps and Calves, Glutes and Hamstrings, Core and Total Body). For each major muscle group, the ‘main moves’ (that is, the fundamental moves that need to be mastered) are described first, followed by variations of each exercise that can be performed with different types of equipment (body weight, barbells, dumbbells, cable and pulley machines, stability balls and even the TRX suspension trainer).

Each and every exercise is illustrated, with easy-to-follow exercise descriptions and form cues. There’s even a section of ready-made workouts at the back (‘The Best Workouts for Everything’), including workouts for athletes, pre-natal women, body-weight only fans and my favourite, crowded gyms.


The Female Body Breakthrough (2009; Rachel Cosgrove)

One of the first strength training titles specifically aimed at getting regular women into the weight room. In addition to a 16-week, progressive resistance program (a program that I return to whenever I get tired of my own programming and want to follow somebody else’s lead…), Rachel Cosgrove’s book also includes advice about mindset, exercise nutrition, hormones, goal-setting and emotional eating.

The workouts are well-illustrated and there are plenty of testimonials to her approach scattered throughout the book; perfect for those day when you need a little motivation, inspiration and re-assurance that the program works. And for those of us who love it when fitness professionals cite actual research studies to back their claims, a list of references to original research in the fields of physiology, sports medicine and endocrinology.


The New Rules of Lifting for Women (2007; Lou Schuler with Cassandra Forsythe and Alwyn Cosgrove)

Another title dedicated to encouraging women to take strength training seriously (the subtitle of the book; “Lift Like a Man, Look Like a Goddess”…).

This books combines 16-weeks of progressive resistance training with a wealth of information on nutrition and eating for fat loss (including a variety of sample meal plans and recipes to support them).

The workouts are functional in nature (squats, lunges, dead lifts, rows, push ups) are rely heavily on standard weight room equipment (dumbbells, benches, barbells, cable and pulley etc.).

I love that the workouts are fairly simple in their design (typically 5-8 exercises, performed in super-set style) and don’t require more than 40-50 minutes in the gym. All exercises are illustrated with detailed instructions on how to perform them safely and with good form. This is another title that I’ve used extensively in my own training.


Kettlebells for Women (2012; Lauren Brooks)

Ever since I took my first kettlebell workshop, I’ve been enamoured with this relatively new-to-the-big-box-gym-goer tool. I love how it makes me feel strong and capable and bad-ass (despite the wrinkles and grey hairs…).

Because they’re not just simply a ‘weight with handles’, I recommend that all newcomers to kettlebell training either get some in-person instruction or find a good book or video to read and study before they set up for their first swing.

I think Kettlebells for Women is the perfect place to start. Beginning with a brief history of kettlebell training, the author outlines the benefits of using kettlebells (both in addition to and in place of traditional dumbbells and barbells) and provides suggestions as to the weight of bells the user should purchase (or have available to them) to maximize the benefits of her workouts.

The remainder of the book outlines a 12-week progressive resistance program. It includes 15 different workouts (with levels from beginner to advanced) and illustrated explanations of each exercise, including the exercises most frequently associated with kettlebell training; swings, cleans, windmills, snatches and the Turkish Get-Up.

The only downside to kettlebell training? The expense of the equipment. And the more frequently you do the workouts, the more quickly you’ll outgrow your equipment 😉


Ultimate Booty Workouts (2013, Tamara Grand aka Fitknitchick 😉 )

If you’re a relatively new visiter to this website, you won’t know that I published my first ever fitness title a little over a year and a half ago. Although titled ‘Ultimate Booty Workouts’, the book is much more than just an exercise program for building a better butt.

In it, I outline my fitness philosophy for women, including the importance of goal setting, tips for finding motivation, non-aesthetic benefits of strength training, nutrition to support your efforts in the gym as well as tips for measuring progress off and on the scale.

The program itself focuses on the core and lower body (hamstrings, glutes, calves and quads), with suggestions for incorporating upper body training and cardio into the 12-week program. All exercises are illustrated (you may recognize one of the models… hint, hint), as are the suggested warm up moves, stretches and foam rolling exercises. There are even blank workout templates for you to photocopy and take with you to the gym.

Curious as to what it was like to actually write a fitness book AND model for the photo shoot? I shared my experiences here and here, respectively.




Books make great Christmas presents. Especially the last one 😉

Do you have any titles to add to my fitness library?

Any books that have been particularly helpful to you as you progress with strength training?

5 Signs your Fitness Mindset is Holding you Back

Do you ever find yourself wondering why other women seem to be more successful than you at reaching their health and fitness goals?


Why your best friend can enjoy wine and dessert without ever gaining a pound, while you diligently stick to your lunchtime salad and can’t lose one? Why the woman on the spin bike next to you hardly breaks a sweat during a steep climb, while you’re barely keeping up and there’s a lake under your bike at the end of class? How the woman who’s always in the squat rack at the gym never seems to miss a day of training, while you struggle week after week with consistency?

Chances are your mindset is holding you back. Those unspoken beliefs about yourself, your abilities and your capacity for change.

Wondering if your head is hampering your progress?

Here are 5 signs your fitness mindset is holding you back:
  1. You’re resistant to trying a new approach, even when the old approach isn’t working (what’s that quote about the definition of insanity?)
  2. You use limitations as excuses (time, energy, equipment, injury…)
  3. You have unrealistic expectations and are quick to judge yourself
  4. You’re threatened by other women’s successes
  5. You’ve been convinced by the media that weight loss and muscle gain are easy (lose 10 pounds in a week!)

In my experience, women who make consistent progress towards their health and fitness goals share a few key attitudes;

  • They focus on change and growth, rather than restriction and limitation. Exercise isn’t viewed as simply a way of cutting calories. Food isn’t ‘good’ or ‘bad‘, just a way to fuel your body to perform well and feel good. If the old approach to eating and exercise stops working (as it often does for women in their 40’s), they’re open to exploring new solutions. They see change as potential, not something that threatens and scares them.
  • They concentrate on what they can do, rather than what they can’t. Limitations can either stop you cold or force you to work around them. Whether you’re working through a knee injury, don’t have much time for exercise or are travelling and don’t have access to your regular workout equipment and foods, focusing on the things you have control over and letting go of those you don’t is key to feeling good about the process.
  • They aren’t threatened by the success of other women. Success isn’t a zero-sum game. Just because your girlfriend can squat 100 pounds doesn’t mean that you won’t be able to some day as well. Her victory doesn’t come at the expense of yours. Celebrate the successes of other women and use them as motivation and inspiration rather than letting them trigger thoughts of inadequacy and failure.
  • They don’t expect it to be easy and aren’t afraid of hard work. The biggest myth perpetuated by the fitness and weight loss industry is that results are yours for the taking. ’21 days to a bikini body’, ‘drop 2 dress sizes in a month’, ‘lose 10 pounds in a week’ headlines trick us into thinking that our goals can be met quickly and without very much effort. Expect the work to be challenging, but rewarding. Both during the process and ideally, for the rest of your life.

Remember, you already know everything you need to do to successfully reach your health and fitness goals. Don’t let your fitness mindset hold you back!

Enjoy this post? Make sure you don’t miss the workouts, motivation and inspiration I dish up weekly. Add your name to my blog updates list and you’ll also be the first to hear about upcoming programs and course offerings!

Overcoming obstacles to exercise and healthy eating

One of the favorite topics of discussion in my online women’s fitness training group is obstacles to exercise and healthy eating. It seems like one of us is always struggling with making healthy choices in the face of circumstances, seemingly out of our control.

obstacles to exercise and healthy eating

This is my kind of obstacle course!

Common roadblocks to consistently following an exercise routine and sensible meal plan include (but aren’t limit to…);

  • special events (I can’t say no to cake and wine at my best friend’s birthday party)
  • poor sleep or low energy (the dog was sick and kept me up half the night, I can’t possibly get to the gym today)

The underlying theme being that, anything other than our normal, well-controlled environment tends to result in going off-plan.

The thing is, only rarely are we ever in that ‘normal, well-controlled’ environment.

I don’t know about you, but my life is one big variety show/circus.

Each week is different from the last, presenting it’s own unique set of challenges to stay true to my fitness routines and goals.

It seems to me that rather than creating structure around exercise and nutrition, we really need to learn the dual arts of adaptability and resiliency.

Adaptability is the art of making due with what you have. No access to the gym? Head to the playground. Cable and pulley machine taken? Sub out a similar exercise that only requires dumbbells. Only burgers and fries on the menu? Go ‘bun’-less and ask for extra carrot sticks.

Resiliency is the ability to rebound quickly after a set-back. Beer and chips and s’mores at the weekend’s Cub camp? Eggs and veggies for breakfast on Monday. Back from an ‘exercise-free’ holiday? Schedule your workouts for the next two weeks as soon as you’re back.


Rebounder fitness is so fun!

There will always be obstacles to navigate. The trick is to remember the end game.

And to remind ourselves that no one can force us to do something we don’t want to do.

In the words of a very wise friend (and member of my online training community);

In the end, the only one who controls my destiny is me

This week, I challenge you to recall these words whenever you find yourself facing an obstacle to exercise or healthy eating. 

40 plus fitness online training | spring session registration now open

Wanted: 10 inspiring, motivated, fitness-and-health-seeking, eager-to-succeed women in their 40’s and 50’s to expand and enhance a well-established and energetic online training community. No need to be fit, thin or nutritionally virtuous. This 40 plus fitness program focuses on exercise, diet and mindset shifts specifically for the hormonal challenges of midlife. Serious enquiries only.



I’m Tamara and I run an online 40 plus fitness training community for menopausal and peri-menopausal women.


  • Because the exercise and nutrition programs that many of us found success with in our 20’s and 30’s stopped working somewhere between 40 and 45.
  • Because we value the support and motivation a group of grown-up, like-minded women provides.
  • Because we still want to look good, but aren’t willing to completely give up wine or chocolate and don’t want to risk injury by performing ‘balls-to-the-walls’ workouts.
  • Because we don’t believe that programs promising that we’ll “lose 10 pounds in a week” or “drop 2 dresses in a month” or “get a bikini body in 21 days” are based on sustainable workout schedules and nutrition plans.
Sound like your kind of women? Welcome home!


Registration for the next 4-month session of my #40 plus fitness Online Group Training Program is now open.

For the low price of $115 ($135 if you choose to purchase the optional course syllabus) you get:

  • an individually customizable workout plan specifically designed for women dealing with the challenges of mid-life hormonal change (including modifications for varying fitness levels and abilities; I’ll help you determine the best options for you, but do not create individualized plans for participants)
  • access to a participants-only video exercise demonstration library (so you can make sure you’re doing the exercises properly)
  • membership in a private Facebook group (to get quick answers to questions and to provide accountability and a sense of community; some feel that this community alone, is worth the price of admission)
  • summaries of the latest scientific research about fitness, nutrition, lifestyle and hormonal change (translated into every day language :) )
  • 24/7 e-support (or as close to it as I can manage given that one of the most important tools for dealing with hormonal issues is adequate sleep!)
  • *NEW* weekly coaching emails to help keep you motivated, inspired and ‘in the know’
  • *NEW* optional meal plans (via email) and exercise form correction (via Skype) available upon request (note that these are NOT included in the cost of the program)

Click here for more details about the 40 plus fitness program and answers to frequently asked questions. Have a question that I didn’t answer? Fire me an email (tgrand@telus.net) or leave a comment in the comments section below.

I’d love to have you join us, but do it soon. Registration closes Wednesday, January 28th at 6:00 pm PST.


Exercise for women over 40 | three key strength moves

With age comes wisdom, confidence and beauty (or so we’d like to think…)

exercise for women over 40

Wisdom, confidence and beauty; we’ve got it in spades!

For many women, the 40’s are a magical decade. Our confidence increases. We care less what the neighbours think. We have our own sense of personal style. And we’re more than happy to speak our minds (sometimes too loudly, according to our children…).

While we may be more comfortable in our own skin, often times that skin doesn’t look or feel the way we wish it did.

Seemingly overnight we find that the workouts that kept us fit and energized in our 20’s and 30’s no longer have the same effect. That our bodies take longer to recover from the dietary indulgences of vacation. That keeping up with our kids (and perhaps grandkids) is more exhausting than it used to be. And while the spirit is willing, our joints just can’t handle those ‘balls-to-the-wall’ high intensity moves during each and every workout (hello injuries and the resultant unplanned breaks from exercise…).

What’s a 40+ ‘girl’ to do? Why exercise smarter, not harder.

Include the following three exercises in your thrice-weekly strength workouts to feel and look better, without having to give up the occasional glass of wine or slice of cheesecake!

Three exercises every woman over 40 should be doing (and why)

1. Hip hinges

Hip bridges, hip thrusts and dead lifts are your body’s best friends. They strengthen your largest muscle groups (the hamstrings and gluteals) without the knee pain many experience when squatting and lunging. Strong glutes and hamstrings can improve your posture, reduce lower back, hip and knee pain, and even reduce that stubborn middle-of-the-body ‘menopot’.

exercise for women over 40

Setting up for a barbell dead lift

Even better? Because muscle burns more calories at rest than fat does, increasing lower body muscle mass via hip hinge movements can accelerate fat loss and help keep it off. Try single leg versions of the above exercises to further challenge your balance; another key component of fitness that tends to decline with age.

2. Push-ups

Looking to increase your upper body strength, tighten your core and tame that back-of-the-arm wobble? Drop and give me 10. When performed properly, a push-up does more than just work the chest. It’s a whole body exercise that requires the coordinated efforts of your arms, shoulders, chest, abdominals, back (both upper and lower), gluteals, hamstrings and calves.

exercise for women over 40

Push-ups from knees (top) and toes (bottom)

Try varying your hand placement (narrow, wide, staggered) and angle of incline (hands on the wall, hands on a bench, toes on a bench) to increase the dimensionality of the exercise. Concentrate on maintaining perfect plank alignment (flat back, tight belly and bum) and increasing the depth to which you can drop before adding more reps. Muscle range of motion shrinks as we get older; don’t hasten it by doing only half the exercise 😉

3. Rows

Combine hours of sitting with excessive front of the body loading (I mean boobs, which, by the way, are a load that gets closer to the floor as we age…). Throw in a past pregnancy or three. And mix with a whole lot of mid-life stress. The perfect recipe for rounded shoulders and forward leaning posture.

Strengthening the upper back is key to standing tall and resisting the effects of gravity. Upright rows, bent-over rows, cable and pulley rows, plank rows; all are great exercises for offsetting our body’s increasing tendency to pitch forward as we age.

exercise for women over 40

Single arm bent-over row

Concentrate on maintaining a flat back (chest out, shoulders back and down), an engaged core (think “tighten your corset”) and a long neck (draw your shoulders down and away from your ears) as you pull the weights towards your body and squeeze your shoulder blades together in the middle of your back.

Putting it all together

Regardless of which variation of the three movements you decide on, aim for 3 sets of 10-12 repetitions of each. Choose a weight (or modification) that challenges you, while allowing you to just complete each set without compromising your form.

Throw in 10 to 15 minutes of cardio intervals (machines are fine, but body weight calisthenics like jumping jacks, jump squats, fast feet on the stairs and burpees can be done just about anywhere) and finish with a slow, static stretch. (Try the stretches in this post >> Essential stretches for mid-life exercisers)

Then get out of the gym and get on with the rest of your day. It’s gonna be awesome!

Do you have a favourite exercise for women over 40 that didn’t make my list?

What is it and how has it benefited you?

The science of creating new health and fitness habits

hab∙it; n. 1. actions that are triggered automatically in response to contextual cues that have been associated with their performance; 2. an established disposition of the mind or character; 3. customary manner or practice

Behavioural change is hard.

So hard, in fact, that there’s an entire sub-discipline of psychology devoted to studying how best to develop new habits (as well as eventually ridding ourselves of the old).

What those studies tell us, in a nutshell, is that we’re doing it all wrong. Making grandiose resolutions, setting unattainable goals and generally, adopting an ‘all or nothing’ mindset. A mindset that ultimately leads to yo-yo dieting and empty February gyms.

If you’re looking to increase the odds of making those new health and fitness habits ‘stick’ try the following:


new health and fitness habits

1. Choose a single, small habit to adopt. Practice it daily until it’s no longer a chore. This might take a week. It might take a month. Commit 100% to it’s practice. Remind yourself that you can do anything for a week or two. Once you’ve mastered it, choose another single, small habit to adopt. The trick is to retain the first habit while cultivating the second. And so on.

2. Associate that habit with contextual cues. Do it at the same time of day. Or in the same place. Use something to trigger it’s occurrence. For example, set your workout clothes out the night before. Put them on as soon as you get up. The clothes are your contextual reminder to head to the gym.

3. Reward yourself immediately. Humans are driven by positive rewards. The more immediate the reward, the stronger its effect on the likelihood that you’ll repeat the behaviour. Note that this doesn’t mean you need to buy yourself a pair of Fluevogs every time you successfully hit the gym.  Try creating a ‘star’ chart. Once you’ve earned 10 stars, treat yourself to something special; a book, a manicure, movie night with a friend. Just make sure the reward doesn’t undermine the new habit; i.e. a piece of chocolate cake isn’t a great reward for successfully eating 5 servings of fruit and vegetables 😉

4. Regularly reflect on your progress and adjust your approach, if necessary. For example, if eating 8 servings of fruits and vegetables a day is the habit you’re trying to create, yet after a week or two of practice you only ever manage to eat 5, change your target habit to what you’re capable of repeatedly doing. Chances are those 5 servings are significantly greater than the 1-2 you were eating before. And once you’ve mastered this simplified version of the habit you’ll be ready to tackle the habit in its entirely.

5. Share your practice with others. Tell people what you’re intending to do and why. Enlist their support. Find an accountability tribe (in real life or online) and check in daily. Research shows keeping behavioural change a secret significantly reduces the likelihood of the new health and fitness habit ‘sticking’, thereby accounting for the popularity and success rates of group weight loss programs and exercise classes.

These are the exact same approaches I share with my personal training clients and the foundation of an all new online group training program I’m excited to share with you.


Introducing  ‘8-Week Healthy Habits Bootcamp’


A two-month program to help you start (or get back to) daily exercise and adopt a handful of new health and fitness habits.

Included in the course are:

  • 8 weeks of workouts, nutrition tips and mindset challenges
  • Twice-weekly coaching emails to inspire, challenge and educate
  • Membership in a private Facebook forum for motivation, accountability and support
  • Access to a members-only exercise library containing demonstrations of all exercises and exercise modifications
  • Unlimited e-support via Facebook (for queries of interest to the group) and e-mail (for questions of a more personal nature)
  • Workouts are individually customizable, with exercise modifications appropriate for beginners, advanced-beginners and intermediate exercisers and for both gym-goers and home-exercisers alike (note that I don’t provide custom programs for participants, but instead, teach you how to choose the appropriate level of each exercise for your goals, fitness level and abilities)
  • Optional one-on-one fitness coaching via e-mail, Skype or telephone (for added accountability, additional exercise modifications and video critique of form; not included in the cost of the course)

Click here for more details about the program, a link to the registration form and A’s to all of your Q’s.


Are there any particular new health and fitness habits you’re looking to adopt in 2015?

Prepare to succeed | Tips for overcoming your inner saboteur

When it comes to starting and sticking with a new exercise program, nobody undermines our efforts better than we, ourselves, do.

The most common stumbling block to developing new fitness habits isn’t time or money or access to a gym or clean workout clothes (don’t laugh, I’ve heard this one more than a few times).


It’s that little voice in our head that tells us “it’s okay to miss a workout” because we’re “tired” or “don’t have time to fuel properly” or “already exercised enough this week” or “can’t find any other time to have coffee with Sally”.

No matter how excited you are to get started with a new program, it’s inevitable that you’ll eventually tire of it and start to look for excuses not to exercise. It’s human nature. We love things when they’re shiny and novel. Not so much once the bloom is off the rose.

The difference between people who successfully push through the excuses and under-mining self-talk and those who don’t?

They expect the excuses to happen and plan for how they’ll deal with it when their inner saboteur inevitably shows up.

Tips for overcoming your inner saboteur:
  • bullet-proof your excuses. Know yourself well enough to draw up a list of the excuses you’ll be most likely to use. Draft a response for each excuse. Remind yourself of your ‘why’; the reason you started down this path in the first place. (Not sure what your ‘why’ is? Scroll down to the bottom of this post and grab a copy of my free e-book “5 Steps to Exercise Happiness”. The first step is finding your ‘why’.)
  • adopt a ‘just 10-minutes’ attitude. Tell yourself that when it comes to exercise, something is always better than nothing. Commit to 10 minutes. If, at the end of that time, you really are too tired to continue (or Sally texts you wondering why you’re late for coffee…), finish up and commend yourself for what you did, rather than berating yourself for what you didn’t. Oh, and if that 10 minutes was exactly what you needed to get  jazzed about working out, continue on. Sometimes all you need is a little movement to overcome that activation threshold.
  • create rules around exercise. Decide what your ‘bare minimum’ exercise week looks like. Create rules to maintain this routine. My two exercise rules? “Always work out on Monday” (for me, missing a Monday paves the way for a less-than-stellar workout week) and “Never take more than 2 days in a row off” (I find it incredibly difficult to come back to the gym after 3 days off).
  • enlist an accountability partner. Have a friend or family member who’d be happy to give you a swift kick in the pants from time to time? I know I do ;-). Enlist their help by giving them your workout schedule for the week and asking them to send you a quick text or email when you’re supposed to be heading out the door. Even better? Get them to commit to exercising with you. Promise to support and encourage each other to follow through with the plan, even on days when one of you isn’t feeling it.
  • hire a personal trainer. In addition to teaching you proper exercise form, creating a program that’s individualized for you and progressing that program at appropriate intervals, your trainer won’t allow you to succumb to your inner saboteur. Just knowing that she’s waiting for you at the gym is often enough to overcome the excuses in your head. (And if they’re still hanging around when you arrive for your workout, she’ll be happy to assign a few burpees to help banish them…)

tips to overcome your Inner Saboteur

What excuses does your inner saboteur tempt you with?

Tell me your favourite way to give that negative voice ‘what for’!

Creating new exercise habits | 21-Day ‘Re’-Bootcamp

Starting a new exercise program is easy. I’ve done it a thousand times.

I get it. We all start new exercise programs with the highest of hopes. Hopes that this time we’ll actually enjoy working out. Hopes that nothing will ‘come up’ and get in the way of our workouts. Hopes that that old college injury won’t flare up again. Hopes that finally, this time around, exercise will ‘stick’.

The thing is, hope is not enough.

Sticking with an exercise and nutrition plan requires that you create new habits and develop new mindsets. Healthy new habits to replace the old habits that are no longer serving you. Positive new mindsets that acknowledge the non-scale related benefits of exercise and clean eating.

Habit creation takes time. Experts disagree on exactly how much time, but it seems that at least three weeks of conscientious work are required to turn new behaviours into ‘just another part’ of our regular routine.

Most people who start a new exercise program fail to make it to the third week. Often times, they start off with a bang. Ambitious exercise schedules are created and complete diet overhauls planned. After missing a workout or three and succumbing to an evening of beer and chips they give up, convincing themselves that this wasn’t the right time to start a new program and that next month will be different.

In order to succeed, people needed assistance with consistency, motivation and forming new habits around exercise and nutrition.

In an effort to help, I created the 21-Day ‘Re’-Bootcamp program.

Beginning December 1st and running through to December 21st, it’s the perfect time to get a jump start on your 2015 resolutions.

ReBootCamp Header 590

The program’s mission? To help both newcomers to exercise and those returning to it after injury, illness or plain old ‘time off’, develop new fitness and nutrition habits. Habits that will in turn, help them in their desire to become long-term, independent exercisers.

The program is 3 weeks in length and includes:

  • weekly workouts; 2 strength and 1 cardio (each with two different levels of difficulty/intensity; one for beginners and one for intermediate exercisers), illustrated descriptions of all exercises and a blank, downloadable template to record workout details on
  • daily emails; for accountability, motivation and inspiration (it’ll be just like I’m perched on your shoulder encouraging you to re-commit daily)
  • nutritional information; information about healthier food choices, macronutrients (carbohydrates, protein and fats), portion sizes and meal planning
  • recipes; some of my favourites as well as links to Pinterest boards I’ve created to support the nutritional needs of regular exercisers
  • a support group; participants can meet and share their experiences with the program in an ‘invite-only’ Facebook group
Frequently Asked Questions:
  • How do I sign up? Click through to the registration page and add your name and email to the sign up form. Easy-peasy. You’ll receive a confirmation email shortly, including a complimentary copy of my e-book, “5 Steps to Exercise Happiness”. Reading it will give you a better understanding of my exercise philosophy and the rationale behind the ‘Re’-Bootcamp program’s design.
  • How much does it cost? Absolutely nothing. It’s FREE. Consider it an early holiday gift, from me to you. You’re welcome!
  • Do I need to belong to a gym to participate? The workouts require minimal equipment. Just a few pairs of dumbbells, a yoga mat, a resistance band and a stability ball. They can be performed at home or at the gym.
  • How much time will the workouts take? Both the strength and cardio workouts can be completed in under 20 minutes. The workouts are purposefully designed to underwhelm you. They are not fancy, but meant to help you create a firm, fitness foundation. A foundation that can be built on once you’ve got consistency nailed down. My goal is to help you create a schedule that you can easily accommodate, leaving you feeling successful and your body wanting more.
  • Will there be other homework? Yes! I’ve sprinkled several tasks and challenges throughout the 21-day program. Most require very little time and of course, the more you put into making change, the more you’ll get out of the program. Expect to spend 5 to 10 minutes each day reading the emails and exploring the resources I’ll be sharing in them.
  • I have an injury. Can I still participate? It all depends on the injury. While I can’t individualize a program for each participant, I can suggest modifications for common limitations. You can ask for help in the Facebook group and I’ll do my best to accommodate. At the very least, you can participate in the nutrition and mindset portions of the course.
  • Why now? Christmas is right around the corner. The program runs from December 1st through December 21st. Smack dab between American Thanksgiving and Christmas. What better time to start creating new habits than the season when we’re all looking for ways to avoid overindulging? Even better? When everybody else is making their New Year’s resolutions, you’ll already have an entire month of new routines under your belt.

Registration is open today through Friday, November 28th at 6:00 pm PST (I need a couple of days to make sure you’re all on the list, receiving my emails and a part of the Facebook group).

Questions? Don’t hesitate to ask in the comments section below or via Twitter or email.


The ‘10000 steps per day movement’ | keeping track with LifeTrakCore

Disclaimer: LifeTrak noticed me conversing with friends on Facebook about my interest in pedometers and the ‘10000 steps per day movement’ and sent me a LifeTrakCore C200 to track my daily activity (non-knitting activity, that is) and share the experience with my readers. Thanks LifeTrak!

We all know that we need to move more.

Not just vigorous exercise, but frequent bursts of low to moderate intensity movement throughout the day. Taking the stairs, walking to the grocery store, getting off the computer and stretching our limbs more than once every couple of hours.

Studies have shown that people who move continuously throughout the day have better health markers than those who exercise intensely for an hour then remain sedentary for the remainder of their day.

As a person who spends lots of her non-gym hours sitting and writing OR sitting and driving OR sitting and knitting, I was curious to know whether I was falling into the ‘sedentary gym rat’ pattern.

10000 steps per day

Enter the LifeTrakCore C200. A pedometer/heart rate monitor/calorie counter that straps on your wrist and keeps track of your daily movement.

10000 steps per day

For the past week, I’ve kept track of my daily steps, aiming to reach 10 000 steps per day. (Why 10 000?)  I decided not to do anything drastic to make sure I reached my goal; just go about my daily business and let the steps ‘fall where they may’. Since I’m a ‘numbers geek‘, I made you a table to look at. Can you see the pattern?

Screen Shot 2013-06-03 at 4.23.33 PM

What did I learn?

  • most days, my usual combination of working out and training clients gets me pretty close to 10 000 steps per day (one of the perks of working in the fitness industry, I guess!)
  • my step counts are highest on days when I teach group fitness (did you know that you can amass approximately 4000 steps in just an hour long Step aerobics class? Come join us!)
  • spending an hour in the gym, mainly lifting weights, added very little to my daily step count (maybe a good reasons to swap out stationary lunges for walking lunges?)
  • no workout, no walking, lots of writing leads to an appallingly low step count (although technically, Saturday IS my rest day. Should we be striving for 10 000 steps on rest days too???)
  • it’s pretty easy to add an extra 2000 or so steps to my day by just going for a 20 minute walk (although now that the bears are out, I’m not sure how often I’ll be doing this solo…)

I like being able to see my daily activity quantified; not just at the end of the day, but part-way through, when there’s still time to get back on track. Plus, going for a walk mid-day always clears my head and improves my productivity for the rest of the afternoon.

Have you every tracked your daily steps?

What surprised you the most about the experience?

And should we still be aiming for 10 000 steps per day on our ‘rest’ days? 😉