Archives for May 2016

The best way to eat and exercise for weight loss | you’re the expert of you

We live in an era of information overload.

Every time we open our e-mail, check our Facebook newsfeed or open Instagram to see what our friends are up to we are inundated with messages (messages that are often conflicting) about the best way to eat and exercise for weight loss and long-term health and fitness.

High rep strength training, cardio intervals, HIIT, Tabata, Crossfit, Bootcamp, Insanity, P90X, 21-DayFix, hot yoga, barre, Piyo, Zumba. What type of exercise should you do to get fit?

Should you follow a low carb diet? Eat paleo? Attend Weight Watchers? Cycle your carbs? Fast intermittently? Exercise on an empty stomach? Stock up on Shakeology?

With so many options out there, is it any wonder that newcomers to exercise (or those returning to healthy living after a hiatus…) have absolutely no idea where to start?

(Indeed, one of the most common responses I get from new newsletter subscribers is “I’m so confused about what I should be doing for exercise and nutrition. Help!”)

If you’re like most of us, you’ve probably tried more than a few of the above approaches. Perhaps you’ve stuck with one long enough to see results. More than likely though, you’ve jumped from program to program, attracted by the ‘next best thing’ and it’s promises of fat loss, muscle gains, more energy, six-pack abs and dropped dress sizes.

I’m going to tell you a secret.

the best way to eat and exercise for weight loss

There’s nothing magical about any of the programs I listed above. (Think about it, if there were, everybody would be doing that program to the exclusion of all other programs and those of us espousing a different approach would be out of business 😉 ).

There is no best way to eat and exercise for weight loss.

Unless you’re a long-time exerciser with very specific performance goals, it doesn’t really matter which approach you take.

Stick with any program long enough and you’re bound to become a fitness success.

the best way to eat and exercise for weight loss

The best way to eat and exercise for weight loss (FOR YOU):
  • It doesn’t really matter what workout program you follow, as long as you follow it consistently. For general fitness improvement, the best thing you can do is find something you enjoy and will do regularly. Take a look at the fittest women you follow on Facebook. Chances are some of them are runners, some are barre fanatics and some lift weights exclusively. There’s more than one path to fitness. Find yours.
  • It doesn’t really matter what diet plan you follow, as long as you follow it consistently. When it comes to eating for health (including weight loss and performance gains), the biggest predictor of success is adherence. Find an approach that you enjoy and can see yourself following for years to come. If it feels too restrictive, it probably is.
  • Own your choices and the consequences. Remind yourself that you have control over every single fitness-related decision you make. Those 24-hours in the day? Yours to spend as you choose. What to put in your grocery cart? Entirely your decision. There’s nobody who can do this for you. The good news? When you’re successful, there’s nobody else to share the credit with!
  • Be wary of whom you trust. Sometimes people have an agenda. Many popular fitness and nutrition programs use network marketers to sell their products. You’ll know what I mean if you’ve ever worked with a fitness or nutrition coach who’s required (or strongly recommended) that you purchase a particular nutrition supplement through them or had you follow an exercise program that was designed by somebody else. In addition to the money they’re charging you for their services, they’re also earning an income on the product you’ve purchased. Do your research and make sure you’re working with a professional who places your best interests above their bottom line.
  • Be confident in the knowledge that you’re the expert of you. Who’s known you longer than you? If you’ve tried a variety of exercise and nutrition programs, you’ll already know which approaches suit your lifestyle best and are most likely to be sustainable. Pay attention to how your body responds to food and exercise. Don’t be afraid to do things differently than the ‘experts’ suggest. Remember, you’re the expert of you.

Follow the above steps to determine your own unique best way to eat and exercise for weight loss, weight loss maintenance, fitness and general health. Then stick with it, modifying as necessary, for the months and years to come.

Although I offer an online fitness program catering to the specific needs and goals of women in their 40’s and 50’s, my clients don’t follow a cookie-cutter program nor are they required to purchase nutritional supplements to see results. Together, we learn to listen to our bodies and practice ‘being the detective’ to determine our own specific formula for fitness success.

Interested in joining us? Add your name to the e-mail list below to avoid missing out!

The Forces behind Obesity: Why Tackling the Issue Goes beyond the Individual Alone {Guest Post}

This week, I’m thrilled to share with you a guest post written by a woman I’ve known virtually for many years. She’s  and author, physician, public health advocate, humor blogger, mother, wife, fitness enthusiast . . . and introvert (although you’d never know it from her Tweets 🙂 ). Thanks Carrie for an insightful and thought-provoking post! 

Telling people they’ll be thin if they eat less and exercise more is like telling them they’ll be astronauts if they apply to NASA. Neither happens that effortlessly. Many factors and outside forces weigh into the equation and make the journey difficult.

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the past thirty years, the prevalence of obesity in the United States has more than doubled in adults and children. It has quadrupled in adolescents.

People didn’t suddenly lose their willpower since the 1980s. Certainly we’re more sedentary than we used to be, a product of both our built environment and our increased reliance on technology. Furthermore, our food environment has exploded with processed food, excessive portion sizes, and easy access to high-calorie, low-nutrient fare. But research suggests there is even more at play, including genetic, hormonal, environmental, chemical, and maybe even infectious factors.

We also now better understand the addictive nature of food high in fat, sugar, and salt. Few of us would binge on broccoli or carrot sticks, but give us a bag of salty potato chips or candy bars, and we can’t get enough. Not with all that feel-good dopamine swimming around in our brains. In fact, simply seeing images of junk food triggers dopamine release, much like seeing white powder does to a cocaine addict.

Add in hormones, human biology that encourages our bodies to store fat and resist weight loss, and an environment full of quick-fix foods, portion distortion, and poor walkability, and you have an issue much more complex than calories-in minus calories-out.

One thing is clear, however: a multifactorial problem requires multilevel interventions. Only when we target all the forces behind obesity will we see any lasting change. Yes, the responsibility ultimately falls on the individual, but to ignore these other forces is to invite failure.

After all, how’s it been working for us so far?

Screen Shot 2016-05-10 at 9.07.55 AMCarrie Rubin is a physician, public health advocate, and medical thriller author. Her newest novel, Eating Bull, explores fat-shaming, food addiction, and the food industry’s role in obesity.