Archives for September 2015

The “All you need is a bench (and your smartphone)” Workout

Disclaimer: The post (and the accompanying video workout) was sponsored by Corning® Gorilla® Glass. As always, opinions, errors and bad puns are my own.

There are three things that I never set foot on the gym floor or in the aerobics studio without;

  • A written plan; Whether it’s an outline to a group fitness class, a new program for a personal training client or my own workout for the day, having a plan is key to keeping the intensity up, the chit-chat down and the workout on track.
  • Water; I use workout time to fit in 1/2 to 3/4 of a litre. I sweat a lot when I’m exercising and use rest breaks between sets to rehydrate and stay energized.
  • My smartphone; Used for playing music and timing intervals in group fitness classes, tracking clients’ measurements and appointments and jotting down the reps, sets and loads completed in my own workouts, my phone is never more than an arm’s length away.

bench workout

Given the intensity of my workouts, the hard surfaces I often train on and the record number of people in the gym this time of year, I know that it’s only a matter of time before my phone goes flying off the back of the treadmill, gets dropped mid-burpee or stepped on by the guy on the bench next to me.

bench workout

Since my phone is essentially my brain’s back-up drive, containing not only all of my professional contacts’ information, but the calendars of my husband’s travel schedule and three children’s activities, I do worry about the potential damage such drops might cause. (Although I’m always up for an ‘excuse’ to upgrade my device… 😉 ).

Apparently, I’ve been worrying needlessly.

Turns out that the touch screen on my phone has Corning® Gorilla® Glass; a strengthened material that’s made by dipping glass into a molten salt bath of potassium nitrate. Potassium ions in the salt bath diffuse into the glass, creating a hardened compression layer on the surface. A layer that helps to protect the phone from damage when dropped.

In lab tests, Gorilla Glass 4 survives up to 80% of the time when dropped from a height of three feet (about the distance from the ‘phone ledge’ on most treadmills and ellipticals to the floor) and boasts improved damage resistance against sharp contact (like drops on the concrete in my carport, where today’s workout video was filmed).

The “All you need is a bench (and your smartphone and Gorilla Glass 4)” Workout

Today’s workout requires only that you have access to a bench and a smartphone; the bench for the workout itself and the phone to time your work and rest intervals.

Set your interval timer for 9 rounds of 45 s work and 15 s rest (18 intervals if you’re planning on going through a second time).

Perform AMRAP (as many reps as ‘pretty’) of each of the following exercises in the allocated interval (45 s), rest (15 s) then move on to the next exercise. See the video below for demonstrations of each exercise and my favourite coaching cues.

  • Lateral bench step ups (left foot on bench)
  • Bench push ups
  • Lateral bench step ups (right foot on bench)
  • Bench tricep dips
  • Split lunges (left foot on bench)
  • “Walking” plank
  • Split lunges (right foot on bench)
  • V-sit with leg lifts
  • Box jumps

Always begin each workout with a brief warm up (5 minutes or so of light calisthenics and range of motion joint movements). End with a stretch, focusing on the major muscle groups, including glutes, hamstrings, quads, chest, back and shoulders.

 

If you’ve enjoyed this workout, please take a minute to ‘Like’, ‘Comment’ and ‘Share’. Positive feedback makes the world go ’round!

 

Disclaimer: Although I am a Certified Personal Trainer, I am not YOUR Personal Trainer ;-). Interested in working with me? Check out the online fitness services I offer. I’d love to work with YOU!

Corning® Gorilla® Glass has been used on nearly 4 billion devices from 40 major brands. Is it on yours? Click here to find out.

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Corning® Gorilla® Glass. The opinions and text are all mine.

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How to become more consistent with exercise

Last spring, I started asking new newsletter subscribers to share their biggest fitness and nutrition challenges with me.

consistent with exercise

Want to see the entire email? Sign up for blog updates and advance notification of new online courses by clicking this image.

(Thanks to all of you who’ve responded; it’s been wonderful to get your emails and to have actual conversations with so many like-minded women; the life of a blogger can sometimes be a bit isolating. Not a new newsletter subscriber? Feel free to share your ‘pain points’ in the comments section at the bottom of the page. And you can always, you know, subscribe 😉 ).

One of the most common responses I’ve had to date has been about the challenge of becoming more consistent with exercise. Here’s a sample;

Consistency. Some weeks I am great with exercise…and then I fall off the wagon and don’t work out…!!!

Number one thing I struggle with; consistency.  I work out for four days, quit for two weeks, and back again.  I know I need to develop a real routine…

Biggest struggle is getting my head back in the game…once I fall off the wagon.

You’ve probably experienced the same challenge at some point in your fitness career; post-holiday, post-injury, post-baby… I certainly have.

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As a fitness coach, I often share my strategies for improving exercise consistency with my clients; after all, without consistency and progression to your program, you’re unlikely to ever reach your fitness goals.

How to become more consistent with exercise
  • Create a schedule. Take a look at your calendar. Identify two or three chunks of free time in your week. Write the word ‘Exercise’ in pen. Treat this appointment with yourself the same way you treat your appointments with your doctor, dentist and manicurist. You may think I’m trying to be funny. I’m not. Scheduling works. Commit to it for an entire month.

How to get more consistent with exercise via fitknitchick.com

  • Set yourself up for success. Many people undermine their attempts to make regular exercise a priority. They choose activities that they don’t really like. They plan to work out alone even though they require accountability and support. They schedule early morning workouts despite their night owl tendencies. They have unrealistic expectations about how quickly they’re likely to see results. Spend a little time reflecting on what you truly need to successfully stick with your plan. Make sure all the components are in place before you step into the gym (or pool or the spinning studio etc.). Need a little more help with this? Check out the free download below; “5 Steps to Exercise Success”.
  • Anticipate obstacles. The road to consistency is never smooth. Obstacles and road blocks will always be present. The key is to anticipate them and have a back-up plan ready to implement. For example, kids get sick and somebody has to stay home with them. If that somebody is you, how will you make up your missed workout? Can you do something else at home? An exercise DVD? A short, body-weight workout? Is there a ‘flex’ day in your schedule for playing ‘catch up’ later in the week?

How to get more consistent with exercise via fitknitchick.com

  • Celebrate small victories. Most humans respond well to rewards 🙂 . Keep your motivation up by regularly reflecting on what you’ve done well and treating yourself to something small and enjoyable. A new  headband to keep your hair off your face during workouts. A box of your favourite specialty tea bags. That Kindle title you’ve been dying to read. Or even a simple gold star on your workout calendar. Celebrating small victories takes your mind off the bigger victories that are still off in the distance (and reminds you that you’re making progress, no matter how small).
  • Remind yourself of how hard it is to start all over again. Most of us also try to avoid punishment. Tap into your psyche and remind yourself how difficult it is to get back to exercise after a hiatus. Not just physically, but also psychologically. Our bodies struggle with things they once did with ease. We have to lower the weights, take longer breaks between sets and huff and puff through our step class or run. Maintaining a positive mindset about exercise becomes more difficult with every repetition of the ‘start and stop’ cycle.

Remember that consistency doesn’t happen overnight or without real effort. But once you get there, exercise becomes infinitely easier (at least until you up your weights or your trainer adds burpees to your program 😉 ).

Do you struggle with exercise consistency?

What strategies have you implemented to become more consistent with exercise?

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High protein vegetarian mushroom and chickpea curry | A #MeatlessMondayNight recipe

Disclaimer: I created the recipe below as part of Silk’s #MeatlessMondayNight campaign. You can find more meatless recipes and enter for a chance to win at the website, www.silk.com/sidelinemeat. If you follow me on Instagram, you’ll know that this campaign was a natural fit for me; I already had three cartons of various Silk milks in my fridge when I agreed to write this post :-).

When it comes to building lean muscles, protein is king. Not only does protein aid in muscle repair and recovery, it also keeps you feeling full longer between meals and helps to ameliorate the blood sugar elevation (and subsequent rise in insulin levels) caused by eating carbohydrates on their own.

While consuming adequate protein isn’t hard if you’re an omnivore, vegetarians and vegans often find it difficult to meet their daily protein requirements.

And frankly, I’m often at a loss when it comes to helping my non-meat-eating clients make adjustments to their diets that will support their fat-loss-muscle-building goals.

In order to better help my clients (as well as keeping my grocery bill down; two teenage boys can do some serious damage when it comes to chicken, fish and beef….), I agreed to participate in Silk’s #MeatlessMondayNight challenge and create a protein-rich vegetarian meal to share with my clients, readers (and family).

In order to ensure that the protein component of the meal was complete (read more about complete and incomplete proteins here), I served my Tofu, Chickpea and Mushroom Curry over brown rice, with whole wheat naan on the side, of course (my boys prefer naan bread to forks when it comes to spooning in Thai or Indian food…).

You probably have most of the ingredients for this super easy recipe already on hand; chickpeas, curry paste, onions, garlic, kale (everybody has kale in their fridge, right?).

#MeatlessMonday

The surprise addition? Silk Unsweetened Almond Milk in place of cream or coconut cream (my two usual ways of thickening one-pot curry-type meals).

While it failed to win over two of my picky eaters (which isn’t really saying much…foodies they are not 😉 )) my husband and oldest son were happy to have seconds and then to re-heat and eat it again the following night.

Left-overs are a bonus in this busy mom’s books!

Fitknitchick’s Tofu, Chickpea and Mushroom Curry | A #MeatlessMondayNight Recipe

#MeatlessMonday

Nutritional Info: Recipe makes 4 portions. When served over 1/2 cup cooked brown rice, each portion contains the following: Calories, 406; Carbohydrates, 57.6 g; Protein, 21.3 g; Fat, 11.8 g. Naan bread is optional and it’s nutritional contribution to the meal will depend on the brand and portion size consumed.

Does your family have a favourite meatless recipe? Please share it (or a link to it) below. I can see making this a regular occurrence at my house thanks, in part, to it’s effect on my grocery budget!

This conversation is sponsored by Silk. The opinions and text are all mine.

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Work smarter not harder | Tips for prioritizing your workouts

In an ideal world, we’d all have time for daily exercise.

prioritizing your workouts

Fitting in all of the recommended elements of fitness (cardio, strength, power, endurance, flexibility, speed and agility and energy system work) wouldn’t be a problem. Seven days times seven hours is lots of time to get it all done.

In reality, most people struggle to find the time to exercise. Work, family, volunteering and life commitments make it a challenge for many.

If I were to tell new clients that they needed to exercise six or seven days each week in order to see results, they’d either abandon our coaching relationship immediately or a few weeks down the road (after attempting to follow my advice and failing miserably).

Instead, I ask them the following questions and set them up for success by designing a plan that fits with their responses:

  • how much time do you have available for exercise (both the total number of days AND the number of minutes per day)
  • how much time do you want to spend exercising (this is typically much less than the total time available 😉 )
  • what is your primary exercise goal (losing weight, gaining muscle and completing your first half-marathon all have very different training requirements)

The less time they have for exercise, the SMARTER we need to be with their workout plans (and of course, the more diligent we have to be about nutrition…).

Given that most of my 40+ female clients are primarily interested in body composition change (i.e., simultaneously reducing body fat and gaining muscle), I make strength training their top priority.

Below you’ll find the starting point for my recommendations, based solely on the number of days each week the client will be working out.

If your goals are more performance-based (for example, training for a full or half-marathon), simply swap the ‘strength training’ workouts for the training mode that’s most relevant to what you hope to achieve.

Tips for prioritizing your workouts

If you’ll be working out 6 or 7 days per week… (make sure you’re not over-doing it and at least one of those workouts is lower in intensity)

  • 3-4 days of strength training (body part splits work well with this time commitment)
  • 1-2 days of long, slow distance cardio (30-60 minutes at 65-75% of max HR)
  • 1 day of HIIT-style cardio
  • 1 day of rest or stretching or restorative-type yoga

If you’ll be working out 5 days per week… (this is my own, personal sweet spot)

If you’ll be working out 4 days per week… (the frequency that most of my online clients adhere to)

  • 3 days of strength training (as above, choose between body part splits and whole-body training) with the addition of a Tabata or HIIT or Metabolic Conditioning-style finisher at the end of at least one of those workouts
  • 1 day of long, slow distance cardio

If you’ll be working out 3 days per week… (I consider this the bare minimum for a regular exercise program)

  • 3 days of whole body strength training, with the addition of a Tabata or HIIT or Metabolic Conditioning-style finisher at the end of one workout AND a short, steady state cardio finisher at the end of another

OR

  • 2 days of whole body strength training, with the addition of a Tabata or HIIT or Metabolic Conditioning-style finisher at the end of one workout
  • 1 day of long, slow distance cardio

If you’ll be working out 2 days per week… (this workout frequency will only yield results for beginners to exercise and help regular exercisers stay consistent while on holiday)

  • You’ll need to fit both strength and cardio into each session; whole body strength plus one HIIT-style finisher and one steady state cardio finisher
  • Plan on increasing this to 3 days per week as soon as possible!

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Three mindset shifts for midlife fitness success

Whether you think you can, or think you can’t – you’re right ~ Henry Ford

When starting a new exercise or nutrition program, most people focus solely on the external behavioural changes they need to make in order to see results.

The number of days they need to work out. How many reps and sets of each exercise they’re expected to perform. Keeping daily calorie intake within a certain range. Drinking enough water. Making sure they’ve packed their gym bag and left it by the front door.

While each of these contributes to success, in my experience, mindset trumps them all.

According to the dictionary:

Screen Shot 2015-08-30 at 1.15.06 PM

This is precisely why, in addition to providing exercise and nutrition recommendations to my clients, I also work with them to create mindsets that set them up for success.

 

3 Mindset shifts for midlife fitness success

Mindset shift #1 : Become the driver of your own health

With all of the conflicting information about exercise and nutrition available to us (not to mention the hundreds of programs out there promising ‘guaranteed’ or ‘money back results’…), it’s not surprising that many people feel overwhelmed and confused about what the ‘best’ fitness and nutrition approach for them might be.

Rather than passively following the ‘program of the week’, choose an activity that you enjoy and a way of eating that you can actually stick with for the long term. When it comes to fitness and health, what matters most is consistency. Do anything consistently and for long enough and you’re bound to see results.

Pay attention to how your body feels and adjust accordingly. Get out of the back seat and become the driver of your own health.

Mindset shift #2: Stop looking in your rear view mirror

rearviewmirror

Regardless of what we’d like to believe, age changes us all. In many cases for the better; just think how much more confident, resilient and comfortable in your own skin you are now, as compared to the 20-year old version of yourself!

The things we don’t like? Greying hair, wrinkles, memory lapses, muscle loss and fat gain. They’re all part of the natural process of aging.

While we can do things to slow them down (hello exercise and whole foods…), we’re never going to look like our 20- (or even 30-) year old selves again. Expecting to wear the same size jeans  you wore before those three pregnancies is unrealistic (for many of us). As is expecting your 50-year old body to once again weigh what you did in your 20’s.

Instead of comparing your ‘now’ you to a younger version of yourself, look ahead and picture how you’d like the ‘future’ you to look (and feel and perform). Find a same-aged or older role model for inspiration. If she can do it, so can you.

Mindset shift #3: Stop confusing acceptance with giving up

I’ve had potential clients say to me, “What’s the point in exercising regularly and eating better if I’m just going to get old and wrinkled anyways?”

In addition to being a completely defeatist mindset, this attitude ignores all the non-aesthetic benefits of adopting a healthy lifestyle; increased energy, better range of motion, more pain-free days, being able to continue doing all the activities that you love, sleeping better, reducing your risk of cancer and other life-limiting diseases, etc., etc., etc.

Acceptance isn’t the same as giving up. Giving up means that you’ve stopped trying. That you no longer believe there’s room for improvement and that your actions have consequences. In contrast, acceptance allows for the possibility of change. It requires self-compassion, self-awareness and self-love.

The key is to set realistic and relevant goals, goals that will help you reach that ‘future’ version of yourself; strong, healthy and happy!

As we knitters say, aim to be a “work in progress” (WIP), rather than a “finished object” (FO).

Have you experienced a shift in mindset that’s helped you to reach your health and fitness goals?

 

 

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