All I need to know about exercise I learned from knitting: 10 similarities between exercise and knitting

I have two great passions in my life (besides my husband, and sometimes, my children); fitness and knitting. At first glance, they seem to be rather incompatible past times.

One involves vigorous whole body movement, the other sitting on the couch, barely flicking one’s fingers for hours at a time. There are special clothes for exercise. Not so much for knitting. You can knit and drink a glass of wine and watch TV simultaneously. No wine at the gym, last time I checked. Exercise is about challenge and progress and setbacks and all out effort. And knitting? Turns out that fitness and knitting are more alike that one might think. There are many similarities between exercise and knitting.

In fact, all I need to know about exercise I learned from knitting.

  1. similarities between knitting and exercise

    I knit socks on 2.25 mm needles, with about 70 stitches around. The leg of a sock might have 70 rows in it; that 4900 stitches in one leg alone!

    Keep the goal in sight, but enjoy the process. When one spends hours making thousands of tiny stitches with small wooden sticks, thoughts of the finished object are unavoidable. But, focusing on the end of the project makes it feel more like work than an enjoyable way of spending your time. Concentrate on how the yarn feels running through your fingers. Stop to admire the evenness of your stitches. In the gym, listen to the beat of your heart. Note how it increases and decreases with your effort. Enjoy the feeling of your muscles as they work to press that weight over your head. The long-term goal is still a ways away; revel in the moment.

  2. Sometimes you have to go backwards before you can move forward. Knitters call this ‘TINKing’ (that’s KNIT spelled backwards). It happens when you don’t read instructions (I can vouch for this one personally), or when you’re not truly paying attention to what you’re doing. Similarly, injuries happen during exercise when we try to advance ourselves too quickly or are distracted in the gym. Setbacks happen and strength must be regained before we can once again move forward.
  3. Always take detailed notes. If you want to remember what you did on the first sleeve so you can knit the second to match, take notes, lots of notes. Don’t count on yourself to remember the specifics or the details of your last workout. When you’re getting results in the gym, it’s much easier to figure out why (and keep progressing) if you know where you’re coming from. Journalling is a truly effective way to measure progress.
  4. Be selfish; no one else appreciates your efforts as much as you do. I am a selfish knitter. I knit primarily for myself. I know that I will love what I’ve knit and will wear it with pride. Knits that I have gifted have not always been so obviously appreciated. Exercise for you and you alone. Don’t do it because someone else wants you to. Don’t do it because you think you should. Do it because you love how it makes you feel and look.
  5. similarities between exercise and knitting

    Stranded knitting has always been difficult for me. Because I am a tight knitter, the fabric usually puckers. This sweater is for my daughter, and I’m proud to say, it’s my best stranded knitting yet!

    Don’t be afraid to try something new. For a long time I stuck to basic knitting projects. Things that I knew I could do well. If a pattern required a technique that I was unfamiliar with, I knit something else. Over the last few years, I’ve become more adventurous in  my knitting. What’s the worst that could happen? I might screw it up. I might not like it. I might have to rip it out. Or, maybe, just maybe, I might find something else that I’m really good at! There are lots of fitness options out there. Weight rooms not your thing? Try Zumba. Can’t stand running? Hop on a spin bike. The options are nearly endless and there are new tools and techniques to tackle almost weekly.

  6. similarities between exercise and knitting

    I gave up knitting this one in the evening; the lace rows were so long I would lose track of where I was and have to rip back row after row to find my mistakes.

    Know when tackling a challenge is a bad idea. I don’t knit complex lace at night. My attention is not focused and my eyes don’t work as well in the dark as they used to. Similarly, increasing my loads in the weight room is best left for when I’m feeling healthy and well, not when a cold is looming or I’m tired from a late night out. Challenge is good, but not all the time.

  7. Variety is a great motivator. I always have 3 or 4 projects on the needles (a simple sock in my purse, something complex for afternoons without the children). When I tire of one, I simply move on to another. Same thing with fitness. Bored with your current routine? If it’s a good one and you’ve seen results, switch it up for a week or two until you again need a change. I like to intersperse heaving weight training days with spinning days (love those cardio intervals!). Over the longer term, I might stick with a whole body training program for a month or two, then switch to body part training (one or two body parts a day) for a few weeks. Rather than do nothing, do something else!
  8. Surround yourself with like-minded people. Before I found Ravelry (an awesome online community of fiber artists; think Facebook for knitters), I had very few people to share my knitting obsession with. Now, I check in with my on-line knitting buddies daily for a dose of inspiration and support. I’ve learned a ton from these women and am continually motivated to try new techniques and patterns. Seek out friends and acquaintances who are as committed to exercise as you are. Motivate each other to do more and better.
  9. similarities between exercise and knitting

    I have a vase of needles like this on my mantle; I grabbed this image from the web.

    Always choose the right tool for the job. The knitter’s primary tool is a needle. But needles come in many different styles (single point, double point, circular, cable), sizes (from 1 mm all the way up to 20 mm and beyond) and weights (stainless steel, wood, laminate, bamboo). Different projects (and yarns) require different needles. If you use the wrong needle for the job, you’re bound to be unhappy with the final result. Same things goes with exercise. You need to match the tool to your goals. Want to put on muscle and gain strength? Forego the fixed machines and light weights. Pick up a kettlebell, some dumbbells, a barbell. Approach the squat machine with confidence. Get face to face with the chin up bar.

  10. Make time for it every day! In order to get better at something and actually see the results of your labors, you need to do it frequently. I’ve been to the gym and knit half a sleeve today… and it’s not even dinner time yet!

There! My top 10 list of similarities between exercise and knitting!

Do you exercise? Do you knit?

What are YOUR favourite similarities between exercise and knitting?

Comments

  1. But the one you gave up on is SO PRETTY!

    Great list — amazing to think of the similarities. Makes me realize I must take up knitting — if not fitness…

    ;)

  2. I bought the stuff to start knitting; now I just need to learn! Any tips on how a (very) beginner gal should best learn this skill?

    • Is there a yarn store near you?
      Most offer learn to knit classes. Once you’ve got the basics down You Tube has tons of videos to help you with specific techniques. And you MUST join Ravelry! It’s free and there’s so much to explore.
      Best of luck!

  3. Keep the goal in sight, but enjoy the process.– this is SO difficult for me because I’m always thinking about the goal. I find this especially true with my spiritual life! Thanks for sharing.

  4. my two favorite things to do too!

  5. I think we might be twins! I am a distance runner who knits like a fiend! I am so happy to have come across your blog! Thanks for this wonderful post. :)

  6. I love to knit and exercise too! And how clever to think of how the two relate! Wonderful post! :)

  7. Congrats on your blog entry being featured on the front page of WordPress.com today!

  8. Great comparison! Thanks for sharing–and hurray for those of us with multiple projects lying around. I adore the lovely gray lace–a shawl? What pattern?

  9. Oi, exercising every day…you’re my hero. I have a difficult time doing it once a week. Yeah, I’m a little heavy and I have a sit-down job.

    Crystal

    P.S. I crochet. ;)

  10. SO glad you are Freshly Pressed and I found your blog. Love this post. Great post showing likenesses between two seemlingly different activities.
    Just this weekend I was thinking how much I’d like to start/take-up knitting!
    You are an inspiration to start…
    Cheers, and great post!

  11. This is a great post! I love the colors you’re using for the Camp Hoodie. I enjoy knitting and do it regularly, but I don’t get nearly enough exercise in my daily routine. Maybe it will help if I think of it more like knitting :)

  12. I really enjoyed this post. I had never thought that the same rules that apply to something as relaxing as knitting could be applied to something like exercise as well. This post has really opened my eyes.

    I’m curious if your hands ever get sore when knitting. I have a lot of pain in my hands and knees, making both knitting and exercise more of a struggle for me, but I enjoy them both so much. Do you have any tricks to help with sore hands?

    I’m a huge fan of Ravelry too, I’ve found some amazing knitting resources there. Even though I’ve been knitting since I was 11, I have a hard time learning new things where knitting is concerned. Ravelry is a great place to learn. Thanks again for this post ;)

    • Yes, I do get pain in my hands when I knit too much.
      I have even been to physio for a frozen pronator teres (one of the muscles that lets you rotate between palms up and palms down).
      I have worked on loosening my grip on the needles. I also take breaks at regular intervals and stretch my hands, wrists and forearms. I am going to Sock Summit in Portland this summer and hope to attend a workshop on Ergonomic Knitting. Will let you all know what I find out.
      In both fitness and knitting I think the key word is moderation, especially if you are prone to aches and pains!

  13. Great piece! Sounds like you and I have very similar knitting habits. I also love to make socks. I admit I had not heard of TINKing before, and now I have a term for something I find myself doing often.

  14. This was an extremely interesting post. Very well written! I like the list you put.

  15. I loved this post! Staying fit is a big part of who I am. I don’t knit but I sew and do counted cross stitch so I can identify. Congrats on being Freshly Pressed.

  16. The process of knitting and crochetting is so calming to me(doesn’t matter that I have to back up sometimes and start over)…I am creating with my hands…Feeling my heart beat by walking fast, biking, or dancing is also pleasurable….makes me feel strong….until I overdue and irritate a nerve…then I back off..and tread lightly the next time…I may have to accept a calmer mode of exercise for my bones in denial…Your post is calming, inspiring, and cleverly comparable. Merci!

  17. Oooh, great post… It realllly makes me want to take up knitting :).

  18. Wonderful! Two of my favorite topics! I also learned something when I first started knitting that applies well to life. You get more accomplished when you keep the middle finger down.

  19. I love how you draw the analogy between the two apparently diverse activities, and build so beautifully on it! Awesome creativity and thought! :)

  20. Cool post, and congrats on Fresh Pressed!

    I do pretty well with enjoying the journey with knitting… since the only things I can knit are pot holders and scarves, I’m not real focused on the end product. :D I like that it gives me something to do with my hands when I’m watching a movie, though… and I’m trying to learn how to use this little knitting loom thingy I have to turn all my heaps of baling twine from my horse’s hay into doormats. :D

  21. Love this post!! I’m building my fitness routine back up, but I have not done a crochet project in months. Got to get the yarn and hooks out. Thanks for the inspiration :)

  22. Thank you for posting! I can relate to the fitness thing (not so much the knitting thing…though I do love to cook, and that has many useful comparisons, I think). Recently, I’ve been in a rut with my fitness. Running the shortest loop at Town Lake, skipping weights, hardly evening stretching. My husband bought me a gym membership and I don’t even go! I sometimes ride my bike to the store for groceries, but this is more for fuel efficiency than fitness (I ride in flip flops or cryin’ out loud!). Your post reminded me that fitness is for yourself, not for others, and I especially liked your line about doing something different rather than doing nothing. Thanks for the renewed motivation!

  23. Great post. I have been knitting for more than 40 years, but TINKing was a new term to me. I have to admit that I often use knitting as an excuse to NOT exercise. I would much rather sit in front of the TV and knit than exercise. However, I know I need a balance of both in my life. I loved your lessons and will try to apply them to exercise.

  24. SO useful! I don’t work out as much as I should (or really….at all…) but all the advice really does pertain to knitting! I hate when people ask me to knit the things, because they almost never appreciate it like I do – heartbreaking!

    The one thing I would add is – it’s okay to be bad at it the first time. That was the attitude I took when I first started knitting, because I expected myself to be terrible; in the beginning, it was, but how satisfying to see my project look more and more professional as I continued on!

    Keep up the knitting AND the exercise, inspirational!

  25. Even better you could knit yourself some leg warmers and sweat bands for outdoor activities!
    This is a fantastic article! They really are quite similar… one thing I would add is…

    * Sometimes it works and sometimes it just doesn’t but that doesn’t stop you from having another go! Practice makes perfect!

    … also…

    *You might not get exactly what you had in mind but you’ll love the finished product anyway!

  26. A wonderful post — amazing how you linked two so dissimilar activities. Everything you said was right on the mark. Congrats on being FP’d!

  27. Sadly, my knitting projects were terrible because of my distraction. Great post and so true about other hand crafting projects as well.

  28. Congrats on being Freshly Pressed! Very creative use of language and imagery. Who knew knitters were also philosophers?! Thanks for inspiring my own exercise routine. I don’t knit but I do crochet (trying to make afghans for all the nieces and nephews), but I must confess I get distracted a bit too easily.

    Crafts like knitting and crocheting that follow a pattern and show quick results are really good therapy for people with depression. They rebuild neural networks in the brain and the feeling of accomplishment improves self-esteem.

    Good work!

  29. Great post! Congrats on being Freshly Pressed! I agree with many of your points. Fitness, like knitting, requires practice, patience, dedication, and a willingness to shake things up every once in a while. So many things in life are like that, no?

  30. Saw this post on the wordpress home page. I’m a pretty enthusiastic knitter (to put it mildly), and I find this list pretty inspiring. I’ve been meaning to get off my butt and start living a more healthy life style. It’s great to know that I already learned the basics – from knitting, as you point out!

  31. YAY knitting AND fitness!

    Couldn’t have paired together two better topics I say!

    So glad you were on Freshly Pressed today!!!

  32. Love the comparisons. I am not into physical fitness. I walk, bike, and practice circus arts – but if I’m not having fun while I’m doing it, I don’t do it. And I don’t do it because I want to be thin and fit. (Instead, I try to eat right and keep stress levels down).

    But I knit. In fact, I stumbled on this blog while double checking a pattern I designed last night. Push yourself. This year has been all about personal growth and new techniques for me. I am a professional knitter, but I can’t do that if I’m not constantly challenging myself and staying disciplined.

    Keep it up!

  33. great comparison between two seemingly different activities!

  34. Paul Handy says:

    I love this blog..something else to check out is this guy’s stuff..
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260772930174&ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT

  35. Paul Handy says:
  36. Who would have thought that exercise and knitting are alike :)
    Brilliant!

  37. I love knitting and cooking but hate exercise, even though I know I need to do it. Must learn to love it – will draw on your comparisons with knitting to help me persevere with it! Congrats on being Freshly Pressed!

  38. Geez, I wish I could knit. I’ve tried and it never works out. But I can exercise, so I’m half-way okay.

  39. I love knitting myself. I’ve volunteered to knit jumpers for homeless children in Peru- the charity is called Te Amo (means ‘I love you’). It’s blessing to be able it. Check out them out on twitter @ProjTeAmo. Congrats on being freshly pressed! K

  40. I never realised how closely knitting and sports resemble each other…lol! Seriously, major kudos for you for doing both. I am too clumsy to attempt knitting and too lazy to do sport. Yeah…. I’m definitely not winning….lol.

  41. Excellent post!

  42. This is a really good post and I like it for a couple of reasons. First, you spin a good yarn – it’s well written and easy to follow information with a good flow and structure. Second, what a creative way to weave together a common thread between two seemingly (seamingly) different activities. Plus I’m always a little partial to articles that encourage people to live active, healthy lives.

    Thanks for posting this and congratulations on being freshly pressed.

  43. Michelle says:

    I try to do both a lot (knitting and exercise), but life doesn’t always work out that way. Thanks for the inspiration!

  44. Congrats on being Freshly Pressed! I smiled the entire time, as I read this. I am a fitness instructor as well as an avid crocheter! I am also a mother of three. I’ve been crocheting since I was six years old. I make hats, scarves, afghans, ponchos, headwarmers, etc. I don’t indulge in the “too-fanciful”; like you, I know when to abandon a project that may require more than I’m willing to give at that moment. Also, I’m now exploring different crochet patterns in order to avoid that same “biomechanical stress” that folks get when they do the same exercises/ fitness routines for too long. Apparently, people are more alike than they are different.

    Thanks for a well-written article, and congrats again! Keep on knitting, working out…and writing!

  45. You are very fortunate to have found such a seemingly opposing outlet. Many people don’t realize that exercise is a stress in itself. Many of us chronic movers often times need more conscious yet quite time than our less active brothers and sisters. Seems counter-intuitive so many people fail to incorporate healthy solace in to their fitness paradigm. Many of my clients are shocked that after initial assessment, my first suggestions involve some increase in rest and meditation. Bravo to you for spreading this essential training technique.

  46. you’re right. if i think about how hard an exercise class is, i feel like i’ll never make it to the end. so i just take it moment by moment!

    cute comparisons.

  47. Healthy Mama says:

    I ma so glad I found your blog! I share both of your passions!

  48. wow~your knitting is so beautiful! Actually my grandmother loves knitting.And when I was a child,all of my sweaters are knitted by her. Love this letter,thank you for your sharing.

  49. eleanorio says:

    Loved this post! I have been knitting the swallowtail shawl on Ravelry for months, all because the nupps were driving me crazy. I finally ripped back to before the nupps begin and started again, this time using a fine crochet hook to purl the yarn through the nupp loops. I am encouraged enough to think that maybe I’ll try some more Estonian lace patterns. Choosing the right tools for the job is definitely an important point.

  50. you are a great Mom :) I think

  51. I love this post! Oddly enough, I was thinking about this today, and realized what I learned in my career (high school and college) as an athlete has helped me to excel in my knitting. Athletes have this intense need to always get better at what we are doing, so we practice until we achieve perfection, or come as close as possible. That need is what has driven me to get better at knitting. I am one to set a goal and not quit until I reach it, at which point I set a new goal. Currently, I am learning new stitches so that I can write some cool patterns, which is a new venture for me.

    Thanks for this read! It’s a good way to look at things. It may get me to look at going to the gym to use the membership I’m paying for :)

  52. Knitting is incredible. I just got into it this year for the first time. I joined a group at my college where we knit hats, scarves, etc. for abused and sick children at Childrens Hospital of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. It can really relax your mind and put the world into perspective.

    I totally agree that getting that physical exercise is necessary for a healthy lifestyle, but sometimes there’s nothing better for the body and heart than a real feel-good exercise :)

  53. How is it possible that your stranded knitting and the one you gave up on are so nice??? I’ve tried knitting only once myself, and I failed miserably. It just isn’t my thing – I have no patience whatsoever! Ha ha, anyways, nice post and keep knitting! :)

  54. Cool.Really helpful.

  55. Loved reading it and missed having knitted since long. I would surely knit soething pretty for my grandson the way I knitted a lot for my kids!

  56. I really appreciate your post because knitting is not only a lesson for exercise but also a very good habit for all women especially for the housewife. It leads women to look after her family periodically as well as make her a good artist. I wear a sweater last winter which is specially designed by my wife. I was so lucky that I able to wear such kind of nice sweater and proudly like to say that no one can make such a beautiful sweater. It was a great presentation only done with her magic hand. Yes, knitting is also a nice way to keep the body and mind freshly at alone home. Women should try to build up this kind of good habit at home.

    • There are lots of great male knitters and knitwear designers out there….
      I don’t think of knitting as just for housewives, in fact, I’m not sure what a ‘house wife’ is any more.

  57. Great comparison! Thanks for sharing–and hurray for those of us with multiple projects lying around. I adore the lovely gray lace–a shawl? What pattern?

  58. Very nice interpretations…the beauty of this post is that how steadily they fit in to other areas of life too. Whatsoever you do, one can succeed by following steps and focussing on each phase step by step. This is how you can move on to the higher levels. Thanks for reminding!!!
    Cheers

  59. Very nice and congrats on being freshly pressed.

  60. I was once again feeling the urge to pick up my knitting needles just a few days back and now your post is going to make sure that I actually do it.

  61. interesting comparison!

  62. How fantastic! A post about knitting on Freshly Pressed – congratulations!

    It’s a great post, I love the parallels you’ve identified. And… did I spot a Monkey sock?! I love the heathered yarn you’re using for it :-)

  63. There are so nice knit you have shared.

  64. This was so enjoyable, but also inspirational. Thank you! As a relatively new knitter and also someone who in the last few years has decided to make a commitment to some level of exercise, your message truly resonated with me. Both have become a very happy part of my life and your advice supports great habits for both. Again, thanks!

  65. That is cool! I will pass it on to my knitting friends. I knitted with my grandmother when I was young. I should get back into it!

  66. Great review! You actually touched some valuable things on your blog. I came across it by using Google and I’ve got to admit that I already subscribed to the RSS, will be following you on my iphone :)

  67. I wish I could knit, my mother and sister are great at it they would always make beautiful sweaters and socks. I once made a skirt for my Barbie. It was brilliant. COngrats on FP.

  68. I am new to your blog. I love it. I’ll be back!

  69. Kimberly Rouleau says:

    Thank you! This was very inspiring!

  70. Congratulations on being freshly pressed.
    I’ve just started to learn knitting and am enjoying it. Thanks for the tips and the analogy with exercise.

  71. Great post! I don’t knit, but I used to do English smocking for my children’s special outfits…birthday, Easter, Christmas…when they were young, and the principles are the same…

    Thanks for sharing!

    Sheila

  72. Milton and Gracie says:

    I’ve tried three times to join, go, and to return to a gym on a regular basis. Three yearly memberships which endured for a very short time. By short, I mean a few days.

    It turns out I am a much more devout walker than gym-goer. However, when I walk, I always have my knit project with me. I never know where I’ll end up, so I have it with me in case!

    I commend you on knowing when to stop working on your lace project! The other night, it must have taken me at least an hour and a half to knit my row. An uncomplicated row at that! Yes, it is patterned, but the pattern only spanned 32 stitches and repeated through out the row ten times. I’m learning to double-side knit, so the row consists of a total of 640 stitches. But, the row was so simple. Finally, I put is aside unfinished and returned to it the following morning. The following morning, I completed it in less than twenty minutes.

    So, you shared a great piece of advice: know when to stop and when to start again!

  73. Love your post! I love to exercise but haven’t ever learned to knit (unless you count what I did in Girl Scouts). I one of the people who I’m ashamed to say would receive something knitted and not appreciate it like I should. I love the sweater for your daughter and knitted lace, though. Mostly what I’ve seen knitted by hand are the big loopy stiches and not very soft yarn. Your blog is great! Keep it up!

  74. Fantastic analogy! Bless those hands :)

  75. This is such a great post! Exercise has always been automatic for me. My grandmother used to knit and it’s always been a hobby I wanted to start (my mom even bought me a beginner knitting kit for my birthday a few years ago). I’ve never taken the plunge because I wasn’t sure if I would be patient enough or had the time, but I am so inspired now. The comparison to my great love (exercise) puts it in perspective.

  76. novelinsights says:

    I love to knit and also keep fit. I especially like your point about trying something new – I’ve lately been doing this alot (mixing up my fitness when I get bored and trying to learn to knit more complicated things by doing small projects and taking it step by step).

    Brilliant post!

  77. minnesotatransplant says:

    I’m so glad you were Freshly Pressed this morning! What a great post and an interesting blog. I will bookmark you. Nice work.

  78. GREAT REVIEW! I pretty much agree with all your thoughts you said in your post, especially at the end of your article. Thank you, your post is very valuable as always. Keep up the good work! You’ve got +1 more reader of your great blog:) Isabella S.

  79. Too funny! And so true! I totally am that way with knitting – I always want to stick to the safe basics and am afraid to branch out. When I catch myself falling into a routine with my workouts I try to mix it up, I should be more watchful with my knitting. Very insightful comparison, nice post.

  80. I think we might be twins. I love your practical approach to knitting and fitness. I took a hiatus from knitting, but after reading this, I’m inspired to pick up my sticks again and finish a project (or three)!

  81. Amazing comparison! I have been wanting to start knitting for some time, but have always been intimidated. This method of thinking might just be what I need to get started!

  82. Nice review! This is exactly the type of blog post that should be shared around the web. Shame on the Bing for not ranking this post higher!

  83. Keep the goal in sight, but enjoy the process.– this is SO difficult for me because I’m always thinking about the goal. I find this especially true with my spiritual life! Thanks for sharing.

  84. Thanks for sharing content to read.I’m happy to read it.

  85. great,it is the idea what I need.

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  87. Thanks for the ‘earburn’. This sounds like a really neat book. Have to add it to my ‘Mother’s Day Wish List’. Hah!

  88. Well, as they say, imitation is the highest form of flattery….

Trackbacks

  1. [...] I have two great passions in my life (besides my husband, and sometimes, my children); fitness and knitting. At first glance, they seem to be rather incompatible past times. One involves vigorous whole body movement, the other sitting on the couch, barely flicking one's fingers for hours at a time. There are special clothes for exercise. Not so much for knitting. You can knit and drink a glass of wine and watch TV simultaneously. No wine at the g … Read More [...]

  2. [...] I have two great passions in my life (besides my husband, and sometimes, my children); fitness and knitting. At first glance, they seem to be rather incompatible past times. One involves vigorous whole body movement, the other sitting on the couch, barely flicking one's fingers for hours at a time. There are special clothes for exercise. Not so much for knitting. You can knit and drink a glass of wine and watch TV simultaneously. No wine at the g … Read More [...]

  3. [...] like the parallels Fit Knit Chick draws between knitting and fitness in this post Everything I Need to Know about Exercise I Learned from Knitting–and if you know a bit about knitting and purling, and like to work out, I think you will, [...]

  4. [...] I have two great passions in my life (besides my husband, and sometimes, my children); fitness and knitting. At first glance, they seem to be rather incompatible past times. One involves vigorous whole body movement, the other sitting on the couch, barely flicking one's fingers for hours at a time. There are special clothes for exercise. Not so much for knitting. You can knit and drink a glass of wine and watch TV simultaneously. No wine at the g … Read More [...]

  5. [...] came up to write a blog post at 8pm, but got distracted by reading this freshly pressed post about yarn crafts, which had a link to Ravelry, a site with lots of distracting stuff about crochet [...]

  6. [...] All I need to know about exercise I learned from knitting Posted on April 24, 2011 by fitknitchick [...]

  7. [...] O.K. I never thought to apply my love / knowledge of knitting to the gym. I have two great passions in my life (besides my husband, and sometimes, my children); fitness and knitting. At first glance, they seem to be rather incompatible past times. One involves vigorous whole body movement, the other sitting on the couch, barely flicking one's fingers for hours at a time. There are special clothes for exercise. Not so much for knitting. You can knit and drink a glass of wine and watch TV simultaneously. No wine at the g … Read More [...]

  8. [...] All I need to know about exercise I learned from knitting [...]

  9. [...] All I need to know about exercise I learned from knitting at fitknitchick  Life lessons all over the place! [...]

  10. [...] Posted by Miri Chandler on April 30, 2011 · Leave a Comment  I have two great passions in my life (besides my husband, and sometimes, my children); fitness and knitting. At first glance, they seem to be rather incompatible past times. One involves vigorous whole body movement, the other sitting on the couch, barely flicking one's fingers for hours at a time. There are special clothes for exercise. Not so much for knitting. You can knit and drink a glass of wine and watch TV simultaneously. No wine at the g … Read More [...]

  11. [...] in whatever colours and textures that I like. It sounds a little selfish, but I tend to agree with fitknitchick that you do a better job of something when you do it for [...]

  12. [...] It sounds a &#406&#1110tt&#406&#1077 selfish, b&#965t I tend t&#959 agree w&#1110th fitknitchick th&#1072t &#1091&#959&#965 &#1281&#959 a better job &#959f something wh&#1077n &#1091&#959&#965 [...]

  13. [...] (Idea/points taken from http://fitknitchick.wordpress.com) [...]

  14. [...] few years, I’ve discovered that I only really need two activities in my life to keep me sane; exercise and knitting. One keeps my body strong and healthy, the other, my [...]

  15. [...] written before about the parallels between knitting and exercise; if you haven’t read this post, you [...]

  16. [...] if we all had a sport or activity that we loved as much? (Although that’s how I feel about knitting, it doesn’t involve enough big muscle movement to qualify as exercise; [...]

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