Posture pointers

“How many times have I told you to sit up straight?”

“Don’t slouch!”

“Stand proud; shoulders back and down!”

Are you hearing your mother’s voice when you read the above quotes? I am, and I’m sure my children are hearing mine.

Apparently, the wonderful world of technology is making our collective posture worse. We sit for much of the day, hunched over our steering wheels, computers, Blackberries and iPhones. We are losing our ability to maintain upright posture.

So what?

Having good posture has both esthetic (how you look and feel) and functional (how you perform) benefits, including;

  • looking smarter and more attractive (always a good thing!)
  • feeling more self-confident
  • deeper and more efficient breathing, leading to
  • better concentration and clearer thinking (the brain needs lots of oxygen to work at peak performance)
  • avoidance of health complications, including lower back ache, poor circulation and slipped discs (to name just a few)
  • improved performance in recreational sports

Want to improve yours?

  • sit at the edge of your chair, with feet flat on the floor
  • imagine a string attached to the top of your head, pulling you upright like a marionette
  • strengthen the muscles of your upper back (traps, rhomboids, latissimus dorsi) and core
  • stretch the muscles of your chest (pectoralis major and serratus anterior)
  • Place your computer monitor at eye level and invest in a good, ergonomic desk chair

Want to know more? Check out this website on posture and ergonomics!

Looking for an inexpensive way to jump-start your journey to fitness and health? Join my online Bootcamp today! Get more info by clicking the image below.

Looking for an inexpensive way to jump-start your journey to fitness and health? Join my online Bootcamp today! Get more info by clicking the image below.

Trackbacks

  1. […] practice mindful posture. Remind yourself to pull your tummy in, retract your chin and rotate your shoulders back and down. If you have a hard time remembering these cues, write them down on a sticky note and leave it where you can see it (I used to leave one on my steering wheel after I caught a glimpse of my ghastly driving posture). […]

  2. […] of the body (or posterior chain) exercises not only improve how you look (think ‘posture’), done regularly they can […]

  3. […] leaning postures; while most of us suffer from postural deviations caused by sitting too much, endurance running can exacerbate the problem if the runner consistently […]

  4. […] posture. Muscles work in pairs to help you maintain proper posture. Muscle tightness on one side of the body results in over-stretched (and often weak) muscles on the […]